gamma-ray astronomy


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gamma-ray astronomy

n.
The branch of astronomy that uses observations of emissions in the gamma-ray part of electromagnetic spectrum to study extraterrestrial sources such as stars and galaxies.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

gamma-ray astronomy

n
(Astronomy) the investigation of cosmic gamma rays, such as those from quasars
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The entire gamma-ray astronomy community is currently preparing HESS's successor, the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), a planned observatory that will be even more sensitive and based at two sites, one in the northern hemisphere and the other in the southern hemisphere.
Conrad, "CTA in the Context of Searches for Particle Dark Matter--a glimpse," in Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on High Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy, vol.
The discoveries of gamma-ray astronomy take our thoughts, theories, and observations to new extremes.
Aharonian, "Design concepts for the Cherenkov Telescope Array CTA: an advanced facility for ground-based high-energy gamma-ray astronomy," Experimental Astronomy, vol.
3C 279 holds a special place in the history of gamma-ray astronomy. During a flare in 1991 detected by the EGRET instrument on NASA's then recently launched Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), which operated until 2000, the galaxy set the record for the most distant and luminous gamma-ray source known at the time.
Symposium on High Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy (2d: 2004: Heidelberg, Germany) Ed.
Piro and Harrison presented their teams' findings April 4 at a meeting on gamma-ray astronomy in Baltimore.
On a grander scale, the remarkable developments of neutrino and gamma-ray astronomy have to show new telescopes and detector facilities like the ground-based observatory for gamma-ray astronomy named Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), the Ice-Cube neutrino observatory at the South Pole, and the KM3NeT at the Mediterranean Sea.