gamma-ray burst


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gamma-ray burst

n.
A short-lived, localized, and intense burst of gamma radiation that originates outside the solar system.

gamma-ray burst

n
(Astronomy) astronomy an intense but short-lived burst of gamma rays from an unknown celestial source. First detected in 1970, they have since been found to be widely distributed in the sky
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Finding an optical counterpart to the gamma-ray burst would settle the issue, because the debris from colliding neutron stars should glow at other wavelengths.
Gamma-Ray Burst: Progress, problems and prospects, International Journal of Modern Physics A, Vol.
Objective: I propose to carry out the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy Legacy Survey (SHOALS), a multi-national, multi-facility, multi-wavelength e?ort to characterize the gamma-ray burst host galaxy population and how it connects to other star-forming galaxy populations at high redshift.
WASHINGTON (CyHAN)- Over the past decade, NASA's Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer has proven itself to be one of the most versatile astrophysics missions ever flown.
Known as a gamma-ray burst, light from the rare, high-energy explosion traveled for 12.1 billion years before it was detected and observed by a telescope, ROTSE-IIIb, owned by Southern Methodist University, Dallas.
Berger's team knew about the explosion after a gamma-ray burst from the collision was detected on June 3 by NASA's Swift satellite.
The most powerful explosions in the universe are brilliant flashes of light called gamma-ray bursts. If you happened to fly through the neighborhood of a gamma-ray burst, you couldn't miss the flare--it would be brighter than a million trillion suns.
Scientists believe the pattern of trilobite extinctions at that time matched the expected effects of a nearby gamma-ray burst. Gamma-ray bursts, or GRBs,are the most powerful cosmological explosions known.
The first gamma-ray burst recorded was detected on July 2 1967 by the Vela satellites.
The most powerful explosion ever witnessed - a gamma-ray burst 12billion light years away - released in one second almost as much energy as all the stars of the universe, astronomers said yesterday.
"This means that it is quite likely that every neutron star that merges actually creates a gamma-ray burst, but we only see a small fraction of them because the jet doesn't line up all that often."
Von Kienlin et al., "The third fermi gbm gamma-ray burst catalog: the first six years," The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series, vol.