gannetry

gannetry

(ˈɡænɪtrɪ)
n, pl -ries
(Zoology) a gannet breeding-ground
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References in periodicals archive ?
housing a sizeable gannetry, snowy in June's eternal afternoon
about the splendid gannetry where every steadfast pair preens in
For example, the British Isles are home to around ten per cent of the world's puffins -600,000 pairs according to the RSPB, with the largest populations found in the Shetland and Orkney Isles, while Bass Rock in the Firth of the Forth, is the largest single rock gannetry in the world.
She is reminded of her days as a new mother by the sight of a cliff-side gannetry packed with nesting seabirds, and at an archaeological site she recognizes that the combination of land features that enticed Neolithic builders to erect a henge were the same ones she surveyed some 4,000 years later.
The 2009 survey showed that Grassholm is the third largest gannetry in the British Isles behind St Kilda and the Bass Rock.
Gannets: An aerial survey of northern gannets on Grassholm island this summer revealed a significant increase in the number of birds breeding on the gannetry in Wales.
l The world's largest Gannetry and Britain's largest Puffin and Fulmar colonies can be found on St Kilda, off Scotland's west coast.
This shows a tightly packed colony of nesting gannets on Bass Rock, North Berwick, the world's largest single rock gannetry.
Up to 32,094 northern gannets were counted at the only gannetry in Wales during the last survey in 2004 and this has now increased to 39,292.
The RSPB said the fastest rate of growth ever recorded on the gannetry is partly due to improved photographic quality allowing better counting.
The Grassholm gannetry has grown steadily at an annual rate of 2.18% up to 2009.
Greg Morgan, RSPB warden on Grassholm Island said: "The survey assessed the current numbers of gannets in the colony and confirmed that this was achieving the Special Protection Area conservation status for the island." Stuart Murray, environmental consultant, said: "Given the importance of the Grassholm gannetry in a Welsh, UK and international context we hope to be able to continue this type of survey every six years to deliver high-quality monitoring of the colony."