gape

(redirected from gapingly)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

gape

 (gāp, găp)
intr.v. gaped, gap·ing, gapes
1. To open the mouth wide.
2. To stare wonderingly or stupidly, often with the mouth open. See Synonyms at gaze.
3. To be or become open or wide: Holes gaped in the ceiling.
n.
1. The act or an instance of gaping: a scoring move that elicited gapes from her teammates.
2. A large opening: a gape in the sail.
3.
a. The mouth, especially when open.
b. Zoology The width of the space between the open jaws or mandibles of a vertebrate.
4. gapes(used with a sing. verb) A disease of birds, especially young domesticated chickens and turkeys, caused by gapeworms and resulting in obstructed breathing.
5. gapes A fit of yawning.

[Middle English gapen, from Old Norse gapa.]

gape

(ɡeɪp)
vb (intr)
1. to stare in wonder or amazement, esp with the mouth open
2. to open the mouth wide, esp involuntarily, as in yawning or hunger
3. to be or become wide open: the crater gaped under his feet.
n
4. the act of gaping
5. a wide opening; breach
6. (Zoology) the width of the widely opened mouth of a vertebrate
7. a stare or expression of astonishment
[C13: from Old Norse gapa; related to Middle Dutch gapen, Danish gabe]
ˈgapy adj

gape

(geɪp, gæp)

v. gaped, gap•ing,
n. v.i.
1. to stare with open mouth, as in wonder.
2. to open the mouth wide involuntarily as the result of hunger, sleepiness, or absorbed attention.
3. to split or become open wide.
n.
4. a wide opening; breach.
5. an act or instance of gaping.
6. a stare, as in astonishment or with the mouth wide open.
7. a yawn.
8. Zool. the width of the open mouth.
[1175–1225; < Old Norse gapa to open the mouth wide; compare German gaffen]

gape


Past participle: gaped
Gerund: gaping

Imperative
gape
gape
Present
I gape
you gape
he/she/it gapes
we gape
you gape
they gape
Preterite
I gaped
you gaped
he/she/it gaped
we gaped
you gaped
they gaped
Present Continuous
I am gaping
you are gaping
he/she/it is gaping
we are gaping
you are gaping
they are gaping
Present Perfect
I have gaped
you have gaped
he/she/it has gaped
we have gaped
you have gaped
they have gaped
Past Continuous
I was gaping
you were gaping
he/she/it was gaping
we were gaping
you were gaping
they were gaping
Past Perfect
I had gaped
you had gaped
he/she/it had gaped
we had gaped
you had gaped
they had gaped
Future
I will gape
you will gape
he/she/it will gape
we will gape
you will gape
they will gape
Future Perfect
I will have gaped
you will have gaped
he/she/it will have gaped
we will have gaped
you will have gaped
they will have gaped
Future Continuous
I will be gaping
you will be gaping
he/she/it will be gaping
we will be gaping
you will be gaping
they will be gaping
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been gaping
you have been gaping
he/she/it has been gaping
we have been gaping
you have been gaping
they have been gaping
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been gaping
you will have been gaping
he/she/it will have been gaping
we will have been gaping
you will have been gaping
they will have been gaping
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been gaping
you had been gaping
he/she/it had been gaping
we had been gaping
you had been gaping
they had been gaping
Conditional
I would gape
you would gape
he/she/it would gape
we would gape
you would gape
they would gape
Past Conditional
I would have gaped
you would have gaped
he/she/it would have gaped
we would have gaped
you would have gaped
they would have gaped
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gape - an expression of openmouthed astonishmentgape - an expression of openmouthed astonishment
facial expression, facial gesture - a gesture executed with the facial muscles
rictus - a gaping grimace
2.gape - a stare of amazement (usually with the mouth open)
stare - a fixed look with eyes open wide
Verb1.gape - look with amazement; look stupidly
look - perceive with attention; direct one's gaze towards; "She looked over the expanse of land"; "Look at your child!"; "Look--a deer in the backyard!"
2.gape - be wide opengape - be wide open; "the deep gaping canyon"
be - have the quality of being; (copula, used with an adjective or a predicate noun); "John is rich"; "This is not a good answer"

gape

verb
1. stare, wonder, goggle, gawp (Brit. slang), gawk She stopped what she was doing and gaped at me.
2. open, split, crack, yawn A hole gaped in the roof.

gape

verb
1. To open the mouth wide with a deep inward breath, as when tired or bored:
2. To look intently and fixedly:
Idioms: gaze open-mouthed, rivet the eyes on.
3. To open wide:
noun
An intent fixed look:
Translations
يَفْغَرُ فَمَه
civět
gabemåbe
zjapiti
tátja a száját
gapa
spoksoti
blenzt
civieť
strmeti
ağzı açık kalmak

gape

[geɪp] VI
1. [mouth] → estar abierto; [hole] → estar muy abierto
the chasm gaped before himdelante de él se abría la sima
her blouse gaped at the neckllevaba una blusa muy abierta por el cuello
2. [person] tourists go there to gapelos turistas van allí y se quedan boquiabiertos
to gape (at)mirar boquiabierto (a)
he gaped at me in amazementse me quedó mirando boquiabierto

gape

[ˈgeɪp] vi
[person] → rester bouche bée
[shirt, blouse] → bâillergap-fill [ˈgæpfɪl] n (= cloze) → texte m à trous

gape

vi
(= open mouth wide, person) → den Mund aufreißen or -sperren; (bird)den Schnabel aufsperren; (chasm etc)gähnen, klaffen; (seam, wound)klaffen
(= stare: person) → starren, gaffen; to gape at somebody/somethingjdn/etw (mit offenem Mund) anstarren; the people stood and gapeddie Leute sperrten Mund und Nase auf (inf)

gape

[geɪp] vi
a. (mouth, hole) → essere spalancato/a
b. (person) → restare a bocca aperta
to gape (at sb/sth) → guardare (qn/qc) a bocca aperta

gape

(geip) verb
to stare with open mouth, eg in surprise. The children gaped at the monkeys.
ˈgaping adjective
wide open. a gaping hole.
References in classic literature ?
Seventy times seven times didst thou gapingly contort thy visage - seventy times seven did I take counsel with my soul - Lo, this is human weakness: this also may be absolved
The aid community has committed to the lofty but so far gapingly elusive target of shifting one quarter of humanitarian funding to local and national responders.
In the early '60s, Polke had started out with hilariously simplistic graphic apparitions of socks in regimental rows, floating cookies, and ornamental sausages, all set against gapingly empty grounds.