garlic mustard


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Related to garlic mustard: Giant Hogweed, Japanese knotweed

garlic mustard

n.
A Eurasian plant (Alliaria petiolata) in the mustard family, having small white flowers and an odor of garlic and commonly occurring as a weed in North America.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

garlic mustard

n
(Plants) a plant, Alliaria petiolata, of N temperate regions, with small white flowers and an odour of garlic: family Brassicaceae (crucifers). Also called: jack-by-the-hedge or hedge garlic
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.garlic mustard - European herb that smells like garlicgarlic mustard - European herb that smells like garlic
crucifer, cruciferous plant - any of various plants of the family Cruciferae
Alliaria, genus Alliaria - a genus of herbs of the family Cruciferae; have broad leaves and white flowers and long siliques
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
concatenata, which grows in dense colonies, by walking along a 100-150 m transect and recording the number of individuals within 2 m on each side, whether they were visibly diseased, and if nearby garlic mustard plants were diseased (Mack and Quang, 1998; Larson et al., 2001; Merriam, 2003).
Geneva, IL -- Students from Fox Valley Jewish School (FVJS) helped uproot invasive garlic mustard from Johnson's Mound Forest Preserve in Elburn this spring, the capstone of their annual community service project.
Garlic mustard prefers sites dominated by mature deciduous forests (Meekins and McCarthy, 1999; Myers and Anderson, 2003), but it is also found in urban areas, disturbed areas, and along roads, railroads and rivers (Nuzzo, 1993).
When parsnips are knee high and start to bloom, and the first indigo bunting arrives and when garlic mustard is blooming, and when early grasses go to seed, then Late Spring begins.
Here, we evaluate all of these responses in the invasive biennial plant, garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata (Bieb.) Cavara & Grande).
* Shawnee Group Sierra Club garlic mustard pull, 12:30 p.m., Bald Knob Wilderness by the Rambarger Trailhead.
Alliaria petiolata (Bieb.) Cavara & Grande (Brassicaceae), garlic mustard, is a biennial Eurasian herb, which was first introduced to North America for medicinal and culinary purposes (Nuzzo, 1993).
Distribution and spread of the invasive biennial, Alliaria petiolata (garlic mustard) in North America, In: B.
Nearly every day, she works with her fellow interns to clear the 80 acres of trails, prairies and orchards of invasive, nonnative plants, such as buckthorn and garlic mustard. But in between the weeds, she has taken time to see all the turtles, frogs, snakes and dragon flies on display.
How soul-satisfying to turn the chore of weeding out destructive garlic mustard and pesky purslane into harvesting for pesto or a refreshing gazpacho.
They fly between April and July, after their caterpillars have spent some time gorging on garlic mustard, cuckooflower and hedge mustard.