gaspereau


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Related to gaspereau: Gaspereau fish

gaspereau

(ˈɡæspərəʊ)
n
(Animals) Canadian another name for alewife
[from Canadian French]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gas•pe•reau

(ˈgæs pəˌroʊ)

n., pl. -reaux (-ˌroʊ, -ˌroʊz)
Canadian. alewife 1.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
A new interpretation of the late glacial history of central New Brunswick: the Gaspereau ice centre as a Younger Dryas ice cap.
ROB TAYLOR is the author of the poetry collections "Oh Not So Great": Poems from the Depression Project (Leaf Press, 2017), The News (Gaspereau Press, 2016), and The Other Side of Ourselves (Cormorant Books, 2011).
"We have to cultivate a community that will support us in our work while we support and nurture it by producing quality books," writes Steeves, co-founder of Gaspereau Press and author of The Arcane Adventures of a Tramp Printer Abroad, Being a True Account of a Canadian Typographer's Visit to Sundry American Letterpress Print Shops, the featured article in Issue 72 (Spring/Summer, 2013) of DA (Devil's Artisan).
Gaspereau Vineyards in Wolfville, and vine-yards are included in the transaction.
* In the Suicide's Library, by Tim Bowling (Gaspereau Press)
She is currently a Creative Writing instructor at Dalhousie University, and her first novel The Lightning Field was published in the autumn with Gaspereau Press.
In Canada, for example, small operations like Gaspereau Press and Doug Minett's Bookshelf in Guelph survive in the face of competition by conglomerates and big-box stores.
In addition to exploring the traumatic effects of the Holocaust, as Gaspereau Press publisher Andrew Steeves writes, J.J.
(20.) lan McKay, The Quest of the Folk: Antimodemism and Cultural Selection in Twentieth-Century Nova Scotia (Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1994), looks at the creation of a "folk" identity in Nova Scotia and the Postcards from Acadie: Grand Pre, Evangeline, and the Acadian Identity (Kentville, NS: Gaspereau, 2003), looks at tourism development at Grand Pre in Part as a result of the Evangeline story.
The southwest corner of New Brunswick along the Bay of Fundy has long depended on marine resources, including significant fisheries for herring, groundfish (cod, pollock, haddock), anadromous fish (salmon, gaspereau, alewife), invertebrates (lobster, scallop, crab, clams, urchin) and seaweeds (dulce, rockweed) (Lotze and Milewski 2002).