gasser

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gas·ser

 (găs′ər)
n.
1. A well or drilling that yields natural gas.
2. Slang Something highly entertaining or remarkable.
3. Slang A talkative or boastful person.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

gasser

(ˈɡæsə)
n
(Mining & Quarrying) a drilling or well that yields natural gas

Gasser

(ˈɡæsə)
n
(Biography) Herbert Spencer. 1888–1963, US physiologist: shared a Nobel prize for physiology or medicine (1944) with Erlanger for work on electrical signs of nervous activity
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gas•ser

(ˈgæs ər)

n.
Slang. something very pleasing or successful.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Montenegrin "Gassers" were, generally speaking, fairly large-frame, double-action revolvers (but not always) with break-open actions and simultaneous ejection.
Over the years, I have attempted to identify this mysterious drug-lab armament and the only firearm I've seen that comes close to this is a Montenegrin Gasser revolver.
CLASSICAL GASSERS: POP GEMS INSPIRED BY THE GREAT COMPOSERS (ACE) Classical Gassers explores the unlikely meeting of the twain with recordings ranging from rocked up instrumentals to lush cosmopolitan ballads.
Pennsylvania's poison perfumer remained at large like the other ghostly gassers.
If you selected a lineman to win, you are excused from gassers (sprints).
As the boys grew older the team evolved into the "Junior Gassers" and finally the "Gassers" of high school and college-age boys.
The Gassers are another family of traditional circus performers, like the Knies and the Steys.
I believe that some of the most fascinating of all European military revolvers were those that are generically known as "Gassers." Not only were they unique in construction and tactical application, but several of them were probably the largest cartridge-firing military revolvers ever fielded.
As well as M.70-style Gassers, some makers came up with hinged-frame, breaktop contraptions with simultaneous ejection, most of which employed the Webley-Pryse-style latching system and an extractor plate that completely encircled the cartridge rims.