gastrolith


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gas·tro·lith

 (găs′trə-lĭth′)
n.
1. A pathological stony mass formed in the stomach; gastric calculus.
2. A small stone found in the stomach of some reptiles, fish, and birds that aids in digestion by helping grind ingested food material.

gastrolith

(ˈɡæstrəlɪθ)
n
(Pathology) pathol a stone in the stomach; gastric calculus

gas•tro•lith

(ˈgæs trə lɪθ)

n.
a calculous concretion in the stomach.
Translations

gas·tro·lith

n. gastrolito, concreción en el estómago.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Gastroliths are formed in a cavity between the columnar epithelium of the gastrolith disc and the cardiac stomach wall.
17] have shown that gastrolith length is a linear function of carapace length; and based on their correlations, the gastroliths retrieved from GCSU 4462 represented a crayfish with a carapace length of 27 to 28 mm.
It is generally accepted that the hepatopancreatic cells play a considerable role in massive calcium movements between the exoskeleton and the hepatopancreatic and gastrolith storage sites during premolt and postmolt stages of the molting cycle in crustaceans (Wheatly, 1996, 1997, 1999).
Understanding the mineralization function of well-characterized matrix proteins such as gastrolith matrix protein (GAMP) from crayfish gastroliths (31) or orchestin from the calcareous concretions of Orchestia (17) might contribute to a better understanding of how the amorphous calcium carbonate in the concretions forms and is stabilized.
He says it therefore appears that as the dinosaur swallowed, its diet of plant material would pass from the crop - where gastroliths ground it - to a gastrolith-free stomach where digestive enzymes attacked the food, then into the gizzard for more grinding, and finally into the intestines.
Like some modern birds, it may have used gastroliths, or stomach stones, to break down hard foods like seeds, and it was likely a plant-eater, said Wang.
Fossilized tracks and trails, fossil eggs, fossilized turd or dung and gastroliths (smooth rounded stones that were swallowed by large planteating dinosaurs to aid digestion) are other, less common, forms of fossils.
The discovery of the gastroliths associated with this plesiosaur specimen were particularly exciting because most plesiosaur gastroliths are found associated with the long-neck morphotype," Schmeisser explained, adding that "the stones described in our paper are much lighter and smaller than those found in long-neck plesiosaurs.
The digestive tracts of both plesiosaurs also contained dozens of gastroliths, stones that paleontologists speculate were used to grind up hard-shelled prey and thereby aid digestion.
The only non-molluscan fauna include two small crayfish gastroliths.