gastropod


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gas·tro·pod

 (găs′trə-pŏd′)
n.
Any of numerous mollusks of the class Gastropoda, characteristically having a single, usually coiled shell or no shell at all, a ventral muscular foot, and eyes and tentacles located on a distinct head, and including the snails, slugs, cowries, and limpets.

[From New Latin Gastropoda, class name : gastro- + -poda, -pod.]

gas′tro·pod′ adj.

gastropod

(ˈɡæstrəˌpɒd) or

gasteropod

n
(Animals) any mollusc of the class Gastropoda, typically having a flattened muscular foot for locomotion and a head that bears stalked eyes. The class includes the snails, whelks, limpets, and slugs
adj
(Animals) of, relating to, or belonging to the Gastropoda
gastropodan adj, n
gasˈtropodous adj

gas•tro•pod

(ˈgæs trəˌpɒd)

n.
1. any of numerous mollusks of the class Gastropoda, as snails, whelks, and slugs, having a single shell, often coiled, reduced, or undeveloped, and moving by means of a wide muscular foot.
adj.
2. Also, gas•trop•o•dous (gæˈstrɒp ə dəs) belonging or pertaining to the gastropods.
[1820–30; < New Latin]

gas·tro·pod

(găs′trə-pŏd′)
Any of various mollusks having a head with eyes and feelers, usually a coiled shell, and a muscular foot on the underside of its body with which it moves. Gastropods include both land-dwelling forms, like land snails and slugs, and aquatic species, like conchs, cowries, and whelks.
Word History Snails, conchs, whelks, and many other similar animals with shells are all called gastropods by scientists. The word gastropod comes from Greek and means "stomach foot," a name that owes its existence to the unusual anatomy of snails. While they don't have feet like ours, exactly, snails have a broad flat "foot" used for support and for forward movement. This foot runs along the underside of the animal—essentially along its belly. The Greek elements gastro-, "stomach," and -pod, "foot," are found in many other scientific names, such as gastritis (an inflammation of the stomach) and sauropod ("lizard foot," a type of dinosaur).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gastropod - a class of mollusks typically having a one-piece coiled shell and flattened muscular foot with a head bearing stalked eyesgastropod - a class of mollusks typically having a one-piece coiled shell and flattened muscular foot with a head bearing stalked eyes
mollusc, mollusk, shellfish - invertebrate having a soft unsegmented body usually enclosed in a shell
class Gasteropoda, class Gastropoda, Gasteropoda, Gastropoda - snails and slugs and their relatives
abalone, ear-shell - any of various large edible marine gastropods of the genus Haliotis having an ear-shaped shell with pearly interior
conch - any of various edible tropical marine gastropods of the genus Strombus having a brightly-colored spiral shell with large outer lip
snail - freshwater or marine or terrestrial gastropod mollusk usually having an external enclosing spiral shell
slug - any of various terrestrial gastropods having an elongated slimy body and no external shell
seasnail - any of several creeping marine gastropods with a spirally coiled shell: whelks; tritons; moon shells; neritids
Ancylus fluviatilis, freshwater limpet, river limpet - minute conical gastropod superficially resembling a limpet but living and feeding on freshwater plants
nudibranch, sea slug - any of various marine gastropods of the suborder Nudibranchia having a shell-less and often beautifully colored body
Aplysia punctata, sea hare - naked marine gastropod having a soft body with reduced internal shell and two pairs of ear-like tentacles
bubble shell - marine gastropod mollusk having a very small thin shell
physa - any member of the genus Physa
cowrie, cowry - any of numerous tropical marine gastropods of the genus Cypraea having highly polished usually brightly marked shells
aplacophoran, solenogaster - deep-water wormlike mollusks lacking calcareous plates on the body but having fine slimy spicules on the covering mantle
Translations
plž

gastropod

[ˈgæstrəpɒd] Ngastrópodo m

gastropod

nBauchfüß(l)er m, → Gastropode m (spec)
References in periodicals archive ?
Attachment scars are also described in morphologically similar Palaeozoic gastropod limpets such as Archinacella Ulrich & Scofield, 1897, Floripatella Yochelson, 1988, Guelphinacella Peel, 1990 and Barrandicella Peel & Horny, 1999.
Gastropod and bivalve molluscs, including mud arks, mud whelks and cockles, can no longer be taken, he said.
Strathmann and Leise (1979) did not observe metatrochal arrests during prototrochal beat for larvae of a caenogastropod, an opisthobranch gastropod, and a bivalve.
Thus, the presence of a permanent population of gastropod mollusks, affected by trematodes' pathogens, in small ponds of the north of Ukraine creates a permanent natural reservoir of fasciolosis and paramfistomatoses.
Although gastropod fisheries are smaller than global finfish and bivalve fisheries, gastropod populations support large fisheries around the world with estimated landings of over 165,000 t in 2016 (FAO 2017).
Predation on bivalve mollusks by gastropod mollusks is common in coastal regions; however, few studies have examined whether predatory gastropod mollusks exhibit prey selection.
First-stage larvae must penetrate and develop to the third infective stage in the terrestrial gastropod intermediate host in which the rate of larval development is determined by ambient temperatures.
The infection route remains unclear with the apparent absence from Germany, Portugal, and Switzerland of the first intermediate host of C faba, the aquatic gastropod Bythinella austriaca, implying that other organisms might be involved in the parasite's life cycle.
The annual SLUG queen contest and coronation, sponsored by the Society for the Legitimization of the Ubiquitous Gastropod, has been a treasured Eugene tradition since its beginnings in 1983.
Of the seven molluscan classes, gastropods make up more than 80% of the species and majority of gastropod species exhibit an extremely limited mobility or are completely sessile as adults.
To document the frequency and diversity of molluscs and the factors controlling their distribution along the coastline of Tarut Island, Arabian Gulf, 4221 gastropod valves and bivalve shells were collected from 10 stations along the coast.