gaucho

(redirected from gauchos)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

gau·cho

 (gou′chō)
n. pl. gau·chos
1. A cowboy of the South American pampas.
2. gauchos Calf-length pants with flared legs.

[American Spanish, probably from Quechua wáhcha, poor person, orphan, vagabond.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

gaucho

(ˈɡaʊtʃəʊ)
n, pl -chos
a cowboy of the South American pampas, usually one of mixed Spanish and Indian descent
[C19: from American Spanish, probably from Quechuan wáhcha orphan, vagabond]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gau•cho

(ˈgaʊ tʃoʊ)

n., pl. -chos.
a cowboy of the South American pampas.
[1815–25; < American Spanish < Arawak cachu comrade]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gaucho - a cowboy of the South American pampasgaucho - a cowboy of the South American pampas
cowboy, cowhand, cowherd, cowman, cowpoke, cowpuncher, puncher, cattleman - a hired hand who tends cattle and performs other duties on horseback
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
gaŭĉo
גאוצ'ו
gaučo
ガウチョ
gaučoгаучо
гаучо

gaucho

[ˈgaʊtʃəʊ]
A. ADJgauchesco
B. Ngaucho m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

gaucho

nGaucho m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
During the evening a great number of Gauchos came in to drink spirits and smoke cigars: their appearance is very striking; they are generally tall and handsome, but with a proud and dissolute expression of countenance.
When in this state the meat is, of course, quite uneatable; but the Gauchos assert, that if buried for some time in fresh earth, the taint is removed.
The Gaucho, when he is going to use the lazo, keeps a small coil in his bridle-hand, and in the other holds the running noose which is made very large, generally having a diameter of about eight feet.
This tameness may probably be accounted for, by the Jaguar having been banished for some years, and by the Gaucho not thinking it worth his while to hunt them.
Theirs was the spirit which upheld Darwin among the gauchos of the Argentine or Wallace among the head-hunters of Malaya.
The menu features spicy sausages, chilli tiger prawns and baby back ribs among others, but it's the gauchos (the original Argentine cowboys) section of the menu where Fiesta really comes into its own.
Brazilian cowboys, called gauchos, roamed the fertile southern Pampas, herdA[degrees] ing cattle.
In Los gauchipoliticos rioplantenses, Angel Rama demonstrates that gauchesque poetry was not written by gauchos but rather by a certain lettered elite who for various reasons had knowledge of the gauchos and their way of life.
Ilustrativo de estos vinculos son las descripciones que el autor realiza sobre la reivindicacion del culto mariano de los gauchos, que se traduce, por ejemplo, en las peregrinaciones a la Virgen de Lujan, en la reconstruccion del vinculo entre el gaucho y la actividad militar (el gaucho soldado, el gaucho milico), la organizacion de visitas escolares y las participaciones artisticas de los representantes de los circulos criollos en las celebraciones que organizaban las cooperadoras escolares.