gauntness


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gaunt

 (gônt)
adj. gaunt·er, gaunt·est
1. Thin or emaciated: "Her smile took up ever more of her increasingly gaunt face" (Lindsey Crittenden). See Synonyms at lean2.
2. Bleak or desolate: "She walked along fast ... scared of ... the few shadowy people and the old gaunt houses with their wide inky doorways" (John Dos Passos).

[Middle English, perhaps from Old French gant, possibly of Scandinavian origin.]

gaunt′ly adv.
gaunt′ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gauntness - extreme leanness (usually caused by starvation or disease)gauntness - extreme leanness (usually caused by starvation or disease)
leanness, spareness, thinness - the property of having little body fat
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
نَحالَه
vyzáblost
magerhed
manneskja sem er horuî/tekin
vycivenosť
cılızlıksıskalık

gauntness

n
(= haggardness)Hagerkeit f; (= emaciation)Abgezehrtheit f
(liter: = starkness, of building) → Tristheit f; (of landscape)Öde f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

gauntness

[ˈgɔːntnɪs] n (of person, face) → estrema magrezza
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

gaunt

(goːnt) adjective
(of a person) thin or thin-faced. a gaunt old woman.
ˈgauntness noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
But now Lola could see telltale signs--she could see the shape and size of her mother's skull!--and this gauntness convinced her that, yes, it was true.
He continued: "I broke the gauntness that had been with me throughout the last period, and of course I did not intend not to score.
Gauntness about him that seemed eternal, him all bowed-up on himself and his bones uprooting from his skin like wings that never fully developed.
intracellularis reduced growth rate, feed intake, and efficiency of gain and increased gauntness and diarrhea.
In addition, the narrator pays particular attention to the old man's poor health: his limp, his "reek / and gauntness," and his longing to be in better condition ("if I was well again") all serve as indices of his physical deterioration.
(19) What Grey describes in his insistence on Ana's eating is her inability to take care of herself, her propensity to self-dereliction and self-diminution (her 'gauntness' (FSD, p12)) which necessitates him taking all control.
i i l The better the piano version is performed the less Ravel's colourful palette is missed and the more one appreciates the gauntness, grandeur and charcoal-sketch delicacy of the original.
Another brittle bone of contention is the movie's plotting, which is predictable and sketchy, to the point of gauntness:
And the austerity of the furniture passes description; in its gauntness it reminded one of the ribs of a London 'bus horse.
The eroticization of the gauntness that is the physical manifestation of HIV/AIDS can be compared to the romanticization of tuberculosis in the Victorian era.
So imagine my heartburn last week upon sitting down to a lovely TV dinner balanced on a tray across my knees to see his Gallic gauntness (yes, I know he's actually from Kent, but with a name like that...) pop up as one of the contestants on BBC Two's Celebrity Mastermind.