gavel

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Related to gavels: staples

gav·el 1

 (găv′əl)
n.
1. A small mallet, especially:
a. One that a judge or presiding officer raps to signal for order.
b. One that an auctioneer raps to mark the end of a transaction.
2. A maul used by masons in fitting stones.
tr.v. gav·eled, gav·el·ing, gav·els also gav·elled or gav·el·ling
To bring about or compel by using a gavel: "The chairman ... tries to gavel the demonstration to an end" (New Yorker).

[Origin unknown.]

gav·el 2

 (găv′əl)
n.
Tribute or rent in ancient and medieval England.

[Middle English, from Old English gafol; see ghabh- in Indo-European roots.]

gavel

(ˈɡævəl)
n
1. a small hammer used by a chairman, auctioneer, etc, to call for order or attention
2. (Mining & Quarrying) a hammer used by masons to trim rough edges off stones
[C19: of unknown origin]

gav•el1

(ˈgæv əl)

n., v. -eled, -el•ing or (esp. Brit.) -elled, -el•ling. n.
1. a small mallet used esp. by the presiding officer of a meeting or a judge usu. to signal for attention or order.
2. a similar mallet used by an auctioneer to indicate acceptance of the final bid.
v.t.
3. to begin or put into effect by striking a gavel: to gavel the committee into session.
[1795–1805, Amer.; orig. uncertain]

gav•el2

(ˈgæv əl)

n.
feudal rent or tribute.
[before 900; Middle English govel, Old English gafol, akin to giefan to give; compare gabelle]

Gavel

 the quantity of grain to make a sheaf; a bundle of hay, rushes, or similar grasses, 1611. See also math.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gavel - a small mallet used by a presiding officer or a judgegavel - a small mallet used by a presiding officer or a judge
beetle, mallet - a tool resembling a hammer but with a large head (usually wooden); used to drive wedges or ram down paving stones or for crushing or beating or flattening or smoothing
Translations

gavel

[ˈgævl] Nmartillo m (de presidente de reunión o subastador)

gavel

[ˈgævəl] nmarteau m (de commissaire-priseur, de magistrat, etc)

gavel

nHammer m

gavel

[ˈgævl] nmartelletto
References in classic literature ?
There was a general burst of laughter, plentifully accented with whistlings and catcalls, but the energetic use of the gavel presently restored something like order.
Down went group after group of torches, and presently above the deafening clatter of the gavel, roar of angry voices, and crash of succumbing benches, rose the paralyzing cry of "fire!"
It was a business meeting, and was transacted in English, but that made no difference to Marija; she said what was in her, and all the pounding of the chairman's gavel and all the uproar and confusion in the room could not prevail.
So high has been the death-rate among these isolated companies that at a recent conven- tion of telephone agents, the chairman's gavel was made of thirty-five pieces of wood, taken from thirty-five switchboards of thirty-five extinct companies.
Throughout American history, speakers have pounded their gavels so hard in search of order that -- metaphor alert!
A man walking alongside the machine wielded a wide hand rake to pull the cut grain from the platform, ideally into neat bundles called gavels. Other workers gathered up each gavel, tied it into a sheaf with a couple of wisps of straw and placed the sheaves into shocks to "sweat." In heavy or tangled grain, the raker was often unable to leave neat gavels and the sheaf tiers had to spend a lot of time gathering up the grain.
Michelle Fischbach, R-Paynesville, gavels in the start of the Senates 201 legislative session Tuesday.
Gavels were banged as the House of Representatives and the Senate on Tuesday convened in a joint session to signal the start of the official canvassing of the presidential and vice presidential election results.