gavotte


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ga·votte

 (gə-vŏt′)
n.
1. A French peasant dance of Baroque origin in moderately quick duple meter.
2. The music for this dance.

[French, from Provençal gavoto, from gavot, native of the Alps, possibly from gava, crop of a bird, from Vulgar Latin *gaba, gullet, throat.]

ga·votte′ v.

gavotte

(ɡəˈvɒt) or

gavot

n
1. (Dancing) an old formal dance in quadruple time
2. (Classical Music) a piece of music composed for or in the rhythm of this dance
[C17: from French, from Provençal gavoto, from gavot mountaineer, dweller in the Alps (where the dance originated), from gava goitre (widespread in the Alps), from Old Latin gaba (unattested) throat]

ga•votte

(gəˈvɒt)

n.
1. an old French dance in moderately quick quadruple meter.
2. a piece of instumental music in the rhythm of the gavotte.
[1690–1700; < French < Occitan gavoto a mountaineer of Provence]

gavotte

A kind of folk dance originating from Gap, in the Haute- Alpes region fo France.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gavotte - an old formal French dance in quadruple time
social dancing - dancing as part of a social occasion
2.gavotte - music composed in quadruple time for dancing the gavotte
dance music - music to dance to
Translations

gavotte

[gəˈvɒt] Ngavota f

gavotte

nGavotte f
References in classic literature ?
Again, there was the little French chevalier opposite, who gave lessons in his native tongue at various schools in the neighbourhood, and who might be heard in his apartment of nights playing tremulous old gavottes and minuets on a wheezy old fiddle.
Vass's Presteigne Festival Orchestra savoured every nuance of Frances-Hoad's imaginative score - nonchalant cello pizzicatos in the Minuet against whistling violin harmonics, jagged asymmetrical rhythms in the Gavotte reminiscent of Stravinsky (whose 'Dumbarton Oaks' concerto was to come later), and a gloriously lush final Canto.
The fourth movements are slow, introspective sarabandes, followed by a fifth movement in the form of a minuet, bouree, or gavotte. All the suites conclude with up-tempo gigues, a jaunty finale to perk up the audience.
It had four movements: praludium, gavotte, largo and gigue.
And Ian Connor, the tattooed Instagram phenom (@ianconnorsrevenge) whose self-assurance may out-scale even his million-strong Instagram following, scrolled through his phone feed, barely bothering to notice that Naomi Campbell had wandered in, clad in sneakers and leggings, to perform a supermodel gavotte -- trailed, as always, by her entourage.
The Praeludium is an exciting up-tempo frolic, followed by a lovely Sarabande, and then a lilting, jaunty Gavotte, very pleasant.
The Act II opener that recalls "My Fair Lady's" "Ascot Gavotte" fails in comparison to the earlier musical.
Pakistan continues to pivot towards Russia and China and is increasingly exasperated with militant India under Modi who is also dancing a careful gavotte with the Americans.
A classic mid-20th-century musical, it renders the high-toned, tight-lipped aristocrats of "Ascot Gavotte" and the raunchy, exuberant Cockneys singing "Get Me to the Church on Time" with contrasting musical and choreographic languages.
The Gavotte, marked Allegretto, was full of life, the smiling musicians communicating the joy they felt to the capacity audience.
Five facts about the Royal meeting hardly worth knowing 1 The racecourse is the setting for a scene in the musical My Fair Lady and the subject for the song "Ascot Gavotte" 2 The racecourse was used as a filming location in the James Bond film A View To A Kill (1985) 3 The James Bond production crew returned to Ascot racecourse for Skyfall (2012) 4 Galileo Gold yesterday became the fifth winner of the 2,000 Guineas since the turn of the century to win the St James's Palace Stakes 5 Women are not allowed to wear sleeveless dresses or bare their stomachs THE Queen has apparently recovered sufficiently from her 90th birthday celebrations and will attend the meeting, as is her tradition.
For the orchestral version there survive an autograph full score and a copyist's set of parts, each of them containing only two movements--an opening Allegro, and a Gavotte that later found its way into Faure's suite Masques et bergamasques.