gaiety

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gai·e·ty

also gay·e·ty (gā′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. gai·e·ties also gay·e·ties
1. A state of joyful exuberance or merriment; vivacity.
2. Merry or joyful activity; festivity: making preparations for the holiday gaieties.
3. Bright color or showiness, as of dress; finery.

[French gaieté, from Old French, from gai, cheerful; see gay.]

gaiety

(ˈɡeɪətɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the state or condition of being merry, bright, or lively
2. festivity; merrymaking
Also (esp US): gayety
Usage: See at gay

gai•e•ty

(ˈgeɪ ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the quality or state of being gay or cheerful; merriment.
2. Often, gaieties. merrymaking or festivity: the gaieties of the New Year season.
3. showiness; finery: gaiety of dress.
Sometimes, gayety.
[1625–35; < French gaieté=gai gay + -té -ty2]

Gaiety

 

See Also: CHEERFULNESS, LAUGHTER

  1. As merry as a grig —Frank Swinnerton
  2. As merry as a mouse in malt —George Garrett
  3. As merry as forty beggars —Proverb
  4. As merry as notes in a tune —Dame Edith Sitwell
  5. As merry as the day is long —William Shakespeare Shakespeare used this in both Much Ado About Nothing and The Life and Death of King John. In daily conversation, ‘cheerful’ is often substituted for ‘merry.’
  6. Gay as the latest statistics on cancer or crime —Elyse Sommer
  7. (Yours is) a spirit like a May-day song —Dorothy Parker
  8. Blithe as the air is, and as free —Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
  9. Cavorted like a mule let out to pasture —Borden Deal
  10. Feeling like Fourth of July —Stephen Vincent Benét
  11. The gaiety of life, like the beauty and the moral worth of life, is a saving grace, which to ignore is folly, and to destroy is a crime —Agnes Repplier
  12. Gay as a funeral procession —Anon
  13. As merry as a condemned man eating his last meal —Elyse Sommer
  14. Gay as a honey-bee humming in June —Amy Lowell
  15. Gay as a parade —Hilda Conklin
  16. Gay as larks —Aesop The use of “gay as” and “merry as” comparisons to larks, crickets and just about any kind of humming or buzzing bird or insect abounds throughout the annals of literature as well as in daily speech.
  17. Heart … lighter than a flower —Elinor Wylie
  18. Making merry like grasshoppers —Robinson Jeffers
  19. A man without mirth is like a wagon without springs, in which one is caused disagreeably to jolt by every pebble over which it turns —Henry Ward Beecher Were Beecher alive today he might substitute “A car without shock absorbers” for “A wagon without springs.”
  20. (Everything went as) merrily as a marriage bell —W. Somerset Maugham
  21. A merry heart does good like a medicine —The Holy Bible /Proverbs The word ‘doeth’ has been modernized to ‘does,’ and the simile is often shortened to “A merry heart is like medicine.”
  22. Mirth is like a flash of lightning, that breaks through a loom of clouds, and glitters for a moment —Joseph Addison
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gaiety - a gay feelinggaiety - a gay feeling        
happiness - emotions experienced when in a state of well-being
jocularity, jocundity - a feeling facetious merriment
jolliness, jollity, joviality - feeling jolly and jovial and full of good humor
2.gaiety - a festive merry feeling
levity - feeling an inappropriate lack of seriousness

gaiety

gaiety

noun
Translations
بَهْجَه ، مَرَحمَرَح، جَذَل
jásavostzábava
festfestlighedlystighedmunterhed
vigalom
glaîværî, kátínagleîskapur
neşeneşeli olmaşenlik

gaiety

[ˈgeɪɪtɪ] N
1. [of occasion, person] → alegría f
2. [of dress, costumes] → colorido m, vistosidad f

gaiety

[ˈgeɪɪti] ngaieté f

gaiety

n (= cheerfulness)Fröhlichkeit f, → Heiterkeit f; (usu pl: = merrymaking) → Vergnügung f

gaiety

[ˈgeɪɪtɪ] nallegria, gaiezza

gay

(gei) adjective
1. happy or making people happy. The children were gay and cheerful; gay music.
2. bright. gay colours.
3. homosexual. gay liberation; gay rights.
noun
homosexual.
ˈgaily adverb
gaiety (ˈgeiəti) noun
1. (an occasion of) fun or happiness. They joined in the gaiety.
2. the state of being gay. the gaiety of the music.
References in periodicals archive ?
Understandably, few critics have stressed the humorous aspects of the Iliad, or pursued Pope's hint "That Homer was no enemy to mirth may appear from several places of his poem; which so serious as it is, is interspers'd with many gayeties." (3) Four sequences in the Iliad illustrate the range and complexity of Homeric humor: the Olympian squabble at the end of Book I, Thersites' intervention at the Greek war council in Book II, Hera's seduction of Zeus in Book XIV, and the battle of the gods in Book XXI.
'I am really very sorry to enclose dismal News', writes Mrs Piozzi, 'but perhaps there never was a Calamity which clouded the Gayeties and extinguished the Hopes of Public and Private so completely as this' (p.
contrasting with the gayeties of Christmas firesides and Christmas festivities outside ...