geason

geason

(ˈɡiːzən)
adj
rare; uncommon
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Geason Training, which was acquired in December 2018, is performing in line with our expectations.
The emotional response to advertising, for example, is one important indicator of the attitude of consumers toward a brand and a predictor of their behavior toward it (Morris, Woo, Geason, & Kim, 2002).
Geason and colleagues found that "among 309 prescription medication order errors, 4 (1.3%) were rated as involving potentially longer hospitalization, 32 (10.4%) rated as potentially causing temporary harm, and 163 (52.4%) rated as potentially requiring Increased monitoring or intervention to preclude harm" (p.
There has been little practical and statistical information available other than that of the dated reports by the Bureau of Crime and Statistics (Burns, 1991) and the Institute of Criminology (Geason & Wilson, 1990).
In a study involving 23,000 American consumers, it was concluded that emotions are twice as important as facts in the decision buying process (Morris, Woo, Geason and Kim, 2002).
Ubiquity has also picked up new contracts with Morecrofts Solicitors, Geason Apprentices and Butterworth Spengler.
Rob McNamara from Tithebarn Street-based Geason said: "Businesses are looking for young people to employ.
Aveda Janell Geason has been appointed to the position of