gelatin


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gel·a·tin

also gel·a·tine  (jĕl′ə-tn)
n.
1.
a. A colorless or slightly yellow, transparent, brittle protein formed by boiling the specially prepared skin, bones, and connective tissue of animals and used in foods, drugs, and photographic film.
b. Any of various similar substances.
2. A jelly made with gelatin, used as a dessert or salad base.
3. A thin sheet made of colored gelatin used in theatrical lighting. Also called gel.

[French gélatine, from Italian gelatina, diminutive of gelata, jelly, from feminine past participle of gelare, to freeze, from Latin gelāre; see gel- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

gel•a•tin

or gel•a•tine

(ˈdʒɛl ə tn)

n.
1. a nearly transparent, glutinous substance, obtained by boiling the bones, ligaments, etc., of animals, and used in making jellies, glues, and the like.
2. any of various similar substances, as vegetable gelatin.
3. a preparation or product in which such a substance is the essential constituent.
4. an edible jelly made of this substance.
5. Also called gel, gel′atin slide`. a thin sheet of translucent, colored gelatin for placing over a stage light to obtain lighting effects.
[1790–1800; < French gélatine < Medieval Latin gelātina < Latin gelātus, past participle of gelāre to freeze]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

gel·a·tin

(jĕl′ə-tn)
An odorless, colorless protein substance obtained by boiling a mixture of water and the skin, bones, and tendons of animals. The preparation forms a gel when allowed to cool. It is used in foods, drugs, glue, and film.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gelatin - a colorless water-soluble glutinous protein obtained from animal tissues such as bone and skingelatin - a colorless water-soluble glutinous protein obtained from animal tissues such as bone and skin
albuminoid, scleroprotein - a simple protein found in horny and cartilaginous tissues and in the lens of the eye
2.gelatin - an edible jelly (sweet or pungent) made with gelatin and used as a dessert or salad base or a coating for foods
dainty, goody, kickshaw, treat, delicacy - something considered choice to eat
calf's-foot jelly - a savory jelly made with gelatin obtained by boiling calves' feet
gelatin dessert - jellied dessert made with gelatin and fruit juice or water
aspic - savory jelly based on fish or meat stock used as a mold for meats or vegetables
3.gelatin - a thin translucent membrane used over stage lights for color effects
membrane - a thin pliable sheet of material
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

gelatin

gelatine [ˈdʒelətiːn] Ngelatina f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

gelatin(e)

nGelatine f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

gel·a·tin

n. gelatina.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

gelatin

n gelatina
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
From such things as feet, knuckles, hide clippings, and sinews came such strange and unlikely products as gelatin, isinglass, and phosphorus, bone black, shoe blacking, and bone oil.
Gelatin: Market 2019 Growing Popularity and Emerging Trends | by Top Key Players, Business Strategies, Solutions, User Prospects and Forecasts Research Report
[USPRwire, Mon Aug 26 2019] Increasing Health Consciousness among Consumers and Wide Range of Applications are Driving the Gelatin Market Gelatin is mostly used for its unique properties such as gelling, stabilization, emulsification, and binding.
[ClickPress, Tue Aug 27 2019] Increasing Health Consciousness among Consumers and Wide Range of Applications are Driving the Gelatin Market Gelatin is mostly used for its unique properties such as gelling, stabilization, emulsification, and binding.
Many studies have reported the development of gelatin crosslinking techniques and the production of insoluble gelatin-based networks; however, most studies make use of toxic compounds to promote the crosslinking of gelatins, including formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde [7,8].
A gelatin sponge is the biological material commonly used to treat traumatic TMPs and chronic dry perforations.
Scientists investigated what effect xanthan gum would have on the rheological properties of gelatin with co-solutes at high concentrations.
Then gelatin is topped on the textured plastic sheet.
In 1 cup cold water, add 1 tablespoon of gelatin. Let stand 1 minute, and then add 1 cup boiling water.
Currently, some analytical methods for the identification of gelatin in products include the electrophoretic method [4, 5], enzyme linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA) [6-8], high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) [9-11], and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) [12-15].
The spinning solution contained 16% PAN in DMSO (min 99.9%, purchased from S3 Chemicals, Germany) and 9% gelatin (Abtei, Germany).