genderize

gen·der·ize

 (jĕn′də-rīz′)
tr.v. gen·der·ized, gen·der·iz·ing, gen·der·iz·es
To make gender-based distinctions within or among: genderize a mailing list by analyzing first names.

genderize

(ˈdʒɛndəˌraɪz) or

genderise

vb (tr)
to make distinctions in (a group) according to gender
References in periodicals archive ?
We used the Genderize.io database to predict the gender of first and last authors on over 166,000 articles published between 2005 and 2017 in high-profile journals that include neuroscience, our own scientific discipline.
Name, genderize.io, http://genderize.io/ (last visited Jan.
As Eckert and McConnell-Ginet point out we are increasingly using they when the sex of the referent is unknown or the speaker does not want to genderize the individual spoken about (Ibid).
In her article, Dorothy McBride Stetson argues that the fundamental problem facing those who wish to "genderize" their courses is that scholarship itself remains poorly integrated.
Indeed, if Djebar chooses to genderize this contested territory of human agency, it is because, once again, Algerian women have become pawns in a political and epistemological power struggle among men.
Complementing the presentation of Jimmy as a self-absorbed, parochial male are streaks of tenderness, sensitivity and empathy in him that run counter to his father's attempts to genderize him into a "tough guy" (17).
She cites studies which range from feminist re-visionings of various mythologies in psychological terms to contemporary theories of education which genderize our "ways of knowing." Women's studies, of course, grew out of such multi-disciplinarity, as it requires the flexibility to locate women's experiences beyond the artificial and rigid barriers of our masculist intellectual structures.
In the American worker-writer tradition, the genderizing of American writing also tends to genderize the concept of class.
And to negotiate the associated difficulty about thinking that divine transcendence is compromised by associating God with the "feminine," which in turn genderizes appropriate ways of thinking and experiencing divine presence and immanence, sacramental or other-wise.
By existing, "El Brujo" genderizes and sexualizes everything, even language, in ways that had not been considered by this society.
(134) Anzaldua genderizes history in this poem by illustrating the multiple layers of power relations that privilege the center intersected by race, class and sexual orientation.