genealogy

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ge·ne·al·o·gy

 (jē′nē-ŏl′ə-jē, -ăl′-, jĕn′ē-)
n. pl. ge·ne·al·o·gies
1. A record or table of the descent of a person, family, or group from an ancestor or ancestors; a family tree.
2. Direct descent from an ancestor; lineage or pedigree.
3. The study or investigation of ancestry and family histories.

[Middle English genealogie, from Old French, from Late Latin geneālogia, from Greek geneālogiā : geneā, family; see genə- in Indo-European roots + -logiā, -logy.]

ge′ne·a·log′i·cal (-ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
ge′ne·a·log′i·cal·ly adv.
ge′ne·al′o·gist n.

genealogy

(ˌdʒiːnɪˈælədʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. (Genetics) the direct descent of an individual or group from an ancestor
2. (Genetics) the study of the evolutionary development of animals and plants from earlier forms
3. (Genetics) a chart showing the relationships and descent of an individual, group, genes, etc
[C13: from Old French genealogie, from Late Latin geneālogia, from Greek, from genea race]
genealogical, ˌgeneaˈlogic adj
ˌgeneaˈlogically adv
ˌgeneˈalogist n

ge•ne•al•o•gy

(ˌdʒi niˈɒl ə dʒi, -ˈæl-, ˌdʒɛn i-)

n., pl. -gies.
1. a record or account of the ancestry and descent of a person, family, group, etc.
2. the study of family ancestries and histories.
3. descent from an original form or progenitor; ancestry.
[1250–1300; < Middle French < Late Latin geneālogia < Greek geneālogía, derivative of geneālogeîn to trace a pedigree = geneā-, comb. form of genea family, race (see -gen) + -logein (see -logy)]
ge`ne•a•log′i•cal (-əˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl) adj.
ge`ne•a•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
ge`ne•al′o•gist, n.
syn: See pedigree.

genealogy

1. a record or account of the ancestry and descent of a person, family, or group.
2. the study of family ancestries or histories.
3. descent from an original form or progenitor; lineage. — genealogist, n. — genealogie, genealogical, adj.
See also: History

genealogy

The study of the ancestry of a person or group.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.genealogy - successive generations of kingenealogy - successive generations of kin  
kin group, kindred, kinship group, clan, kin, tribe - group of people related by blood or marriage
blood line, bloodline, ancestry, lineage, pedigree, stemma, line of descent, parentage, blood, origin, descent, stock, line - the descendants of one individual; "his entire lineage has been warriors"
2.genealogy - the study or investigation of ancestry and family history
discipline, field of study, subject area, subject field, bailiwick, subject, field, study - a branch of knowledge; "in what discipline is his doctorate?"; "teachers should be well trained in their subject"; "anthropology is the study of human beings"

genealogy

noun ancestry, descent, pedigree, line, origin, extraction, lineage, family tree, parentage, derivation, blood line He had sat and repeated his family's genealogy to her.

genealogy

noun
1. A written record of ancestry:
2. One's ancestors or their character or one's ancestral derivation:
Translations
genealogierodokmen
genealogislægtsforskningstamtræ
genealogijarodoslovlje
genealógianemzedékrend
ættartaflaættfræîi
genealogasgenealogijagenealoginis
ciltskoksģenealoģija, radu raksti
genealogiekwartierstaatparenteelstamboomstamboomonderzoek
genealógia

genealogy

[ˌdʒiːnɪˈælədʒɪ] Ngenealogía f

genealogy

[ˌdʒiːniˈælədʒi] ngénéalogie fgene pool npatrimoine m génétique

genealogy

nGenealogie f, → Stammbaumforschung f; (= ancestry)Stammbaum m

genealogy

[ˌdʒiːnɪˈælədʒɪ] ngenealogia

genealogy

(dʒiːniˈӕlədʒi) plural geneˈalogies
1. noun the history of families from generation to generation. the genealogy of the royal house of Tudor.
2. a plan, list etc of the ancestors of a person or family.
ˌgeneaˈlogical (-ˈlo-) adjective
ˌgeneˈalogist noun
a person who studies or makes genealogies.
References in periodicals archive ?
93) Hence the Foucaultian emphasis on genealogizing and more generally on "refusing" identity, rather than urging states to recognize it via group rights, accommodations for minority cultures, or "external" protections.
identifies Michel Foucault's genealogizing work in history and philosophy as a key resource for theology, particularly his critique of the power structures of contemporary societies and churches.
What such a genealogizing for world- and self-creation might also call to mind, though, is the inducement to encapsulation in hellish self-contradiction repeatedly signed by leading imaginative thinkers in "the Reflective Age," "the age of the first person singular," or, again in the words of Emerson, "the Age of Suicide" (1903-04, 5.