generative grammar


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Related to generative grammar: universal grammar

generative grammar

n.
1. A linguistic theory that attempts to describe a native speaker's tacit grammatical knowledge by a system of rules that specify all of the well-formed, or grammatical, sentences of a language while excluding all ungrammatical, or impossible, sentences.
2. A grammar constructed according to this theory.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

generative grammar

n
(Linguistics) a description of a language in terms of explicit rules that ideally generate all and only the grammatical sentences of the language. Compare transformational grammar
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gen′erative gram′mar


n.
1. a linguistic theory that attempts to describe the tacit knowledge a native speaker has of a language by establishing a set of formal rules that generate all the possible grammatical sentences of a language, while excluding all unacceptable sentences. Compare transformational grammar.
2. a set of such rules.
[1955–60]
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ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.generative grammar - (linguistics) a type of grammar that describes syntax in terms of a set of logical rules that can generate all and only the infinite number of grammatical sentences in a language and assigns them all the correct structural description
linguistics - the scientific study of language
syntax - studies of the rules for forming admissible sentences
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
generative Grammatik

generative grammar

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References in periodicals archive ?
A study of word formation in generative grammar. Lisse/ Dordrecht: The Peter de Ridder Press/Foris Publications
A perspective of a different nature in relation to the discursive norm opens up on the basis of generative grammar principles in the design of the language norm, as indicated by several contemporary researchers (Ducrot & Schaeffer 1995).
After presenting early developments in generative grammar, the function of transformations, and the properties of concatenation, Collins suggests that the required combinatorial principle might be identified with the basic set theoretic operation called Merge.
One goal of Noam Chomsky's generative grammar has been to explain how speakers can understand indefinitely many new utterances, despite receiving only finite information from their surroundings.
As a result of this evolution, a discussion has been set up between those who still see a theoretical dimension in the concept of "corpus linguistics" (Teubert, 2005; Tognini-Bonelli, 2001) and those who see it only as a methodological framework that is in principle compatible with any theoretical approach to the language, even with generative grammar (Meyer, 2002).
As a graduate of the 1974 class of Estonian philology at the University of Tartu she belongs to the generation of the generative grammar group (GGG).
The theory of generative grammar that Chomsky laid out in a series of papers that began with his master's thesis at the University of Pennsylvania and culminated in his landmark 1957 paper "Syntactic Structures" has to be regarded as one of the most powerful and influential ideas of the 20th century, reshaping crucial debates in the fields of linguistics, behavioral psychology, and cognitive science.
What I remember best from this debate is that Professor Szwedek quite fiercely expressed his lack of interest in the type of syntactic analysis undertaken in Generative Grammar. Such a firm, strictly functionalist position has been confirmed in all the reviewer's earlier and subsequent written work.
The major caveat arises in keeping with the tradition of generative grammar. Over a period of 50 years, the aim of Chomsky and followers has been to account for a human faculty of language, defined as the ability to produce and understand an infinite number of grammatical sentences.
In reply to the second query, the author reviews the copious and sometimes scattered published research on Italian phonology from Pietro Bembo's (1470-1547) Prose della volgar lingua (1525) to Mario Saltarelli's groundbreaking theoretical work (A Phonology of Italian in a Generative Grammar, 1970, The Hague: Mouton) as well as the most recent scholarship on Italian phonology through 2007.
In the second part of the chapter, some different theories of language structure proposed by Richard Hudson and other linguists will be evaluated and compared with Chomsky's generative grammar. In the second chapter and the third chapter, I will address two philosophical questions.