genetic marker

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genetic marker

n.
A gene, DNA sequence, or gene product whose inheritance can be traced through a pedigree or phylogeny. Genetic markers are used in paternity testing, studies of evolution, and evaluating genetic contributions to phenotypes including disease. Genetic markers associated with certain diseases can often be detected in the blood serum, where their presence is used to determine whether a person is at high risk for developing a disease.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

genetic marker

n
(Genetics) a gene with two or more alternative forms, producing readily identifiable variations in a particular character, used in studies of linkage, genetic mapping, and identification of the presence of other genes that are closely linked to, and therefore usually inherited with, it
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

genet′ic mark′er


n.
any gene or allele that is associated with a specific chromosome and can be used to identify the chromosome or to locate other genes or alleles. Also called marker , marker gene.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.genetic marker - a specific gene that produces a recognizable trait and can be used in family or population studies
cistron, gene, factor - (genetics) a segment of DNA that is involved in producing a polypeptide chain; it can include regions preceding and following the coding DNA as well as introns between the exons; it is considered a unit of heredity; "genes were formerly called factors"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
marqueur génétique
References in periodicals archive ?
A genetic determinant required for continuous reinfection of adjacent cells on large plasmid in S.
"We established that the underlying genetic architecture is highly complex, there is certainly no single genetic determinant -- sometimes referred to as the 'gay gene' in the media.
2 ( ANI ): A new research has claimed that 'strong genetic determinant' has no influence on us becoming left handed or right handed.
Up to now, the main genetic determinant known to be involved in the development of renal carcinoma was mutation of the VHL (Von Hippel-Lindau) gene.
Marker-assisted selection is a process whereby a marker--morphological, biochemical or one based on DNA/RNA variation--is used to select a genetic determinant or determinants of a trait of interest.
There is no known genetic determinant, although it has been reported in siblings and in identical twins in the same family.
A monumental study of 15,000 people with MS, including some identical twins who were reared miles apart in different families, clearly demonstrated that there is a genetic determinant to who gets MS and who does not.
Taken together, the findings suggest that the VPS35 mutation is the genetic determinant of the late-onset PD examined in the studies and that perturbation of retromer-mediated protein sorting is linked with neurodegeneration.
One possible new genetic determinant for cardiovascular risk is the common coding sequence variation in the MBL gene, which encodes mannose-binding lectin (MBL) (5).
MYCN is a known genetic determinant of neuroblastoma and elevated levels have been observed in one third of neuroblastoma patients.
Furthermore, nucleotide sequence analysis of the DNA region containing the florfenicol resistance gene and the two tetracycline genetic determinants showed a 94% similarity to a sequence found in a plasmid from P.
Mycobacterium leprae-host-cell interactions and genetic determinants in leprosy: an overview.