genitive


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Related to genitive: double genitive, accusative

gen·i·tive

 (jĕn′ĭ-tĭv)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or being the grammatical case expressing possession, measurement, or source.
2. Of or relating to an affix or construction, such as a prepositional phrase, characteristic of the genitive case.
n.
1. The genitive case.
2. A word or form in the genitive case.

[Middle English genetif, from Latin genetīvus, from genitus, past participle of gignere, to beget; see genə- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

genitive

(ˈdʒɛnɪtɪv) grammar
adj
(Grammar) denoting a case of nouns, pronouns, and adjectives in inflected languages used to indicate a relation of ownership or association, usually translated by English of
n
(Grammar)
a. the genitive case
b. a word or speech element in this case
[C14: from Latin genetīvus relating to birth, from gignere to produce]
genitival adj
ˌgeniˈtivally adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gen•i•tive

(ˈdʒɛn ɪ tɪv)
adj.
1. of or designating a grammatical case typically indicating possession, measure, origin, or other close association, as painter's, week's, author's, and women's in the painter's brush, a week's pay, the author's book, and women's colleges.
2. pertaining to a construction similar to such a case in function or meaning, esp. in English a prepositional phrase with of, as in the home of the mayor.
n.
3. the genitive case.
4. a word or other form in the genitive case.
5. a construction expressing a relationship usu. indicated by the genitive case.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Medieval Latin genitīvus= Latin genit(us), past participle of gignere to beget + -īvus -ive]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

genitive

A noun case that indicates possession, measurement, or source.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.genitive - the case expressing ownership
oblique, oblique case - any grammatical case other than the nominative
attributive genitive, attributive genitive case - a word in the genitive case that is used as an attributive adjective; "an example of the attributive genetive is `John's' in `John's mother'"
Adj.1.genitive - serving to express or indicate possession; "possessive pronouns"; "the genitive endings"
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
حالة المُلْكِيَّه
genitivgenitivnídruhý pád
ejefaldgenitiv
Genitivgenitivisch
génitifgénitive
genitiv
birtokos esetbirtokos
eignarfall
kilmininkas
ģenitīva-ģenitīvs
genitivagenitivo
caz genitivgenitiv
genitívgenitívnydruhý pád
rodilnik
genitiv
-in haliiyelik hali

genitive

[ˈdʒenɪtɪv] (Ling)
A. Ngenitivo m
B. CPD genitive case Ncaso m genitivo
in the genitive caseen el genitivo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

genitive

[ˈdʒɛnɪtɪv] ngénitif m
in the genitive → au génitif
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

genitive

n (Gram) → Genitiv m; in the genitiveim Genitiv
adjGenitiv-; genitive objectGenitivobjekt nt; genitive caseGenitiv m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

genitive

[ˈdʒɛnɪtɪv]
1. adjgenitivo/a
2. ngenitivo
in the genitive → al genitivo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

genitive

(ˈdʒenitiv) noun
(the case or form of) a noun, pronoun etc which shows possession. In John's hat, `John's' is in the genitive / is a genitive; (also adjective) the genitive case.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
However, this rain is not resting, but is doing something ACTIVELY,--it is falling--to interfere with the bird, likely--and this indicates MOVEMENT, which has the effect of sliding it into the Accusative case and changing DEM Regen into DEN Regen." Having completed the grammatical horoscope of this matter, I answer up confidently and state in German that the bird is staying in the blacksmith shop "wegen (on account of) DEN Regen." Then the teacher lets me softly down with the remark that whenever the word "wegen" drops into a sentence, it ALWAYS throws that subject into the GENITIVE case, regardless of consequences--and therefore this bird stayed in the blacksmith shop "wegen DES Regens."
He very soon set down poor Tom as a thoroughly stupid lad; for though by hard labor he could get particular declensions into his brain, anything so abstract as the relation between cases and terminations could by no means get such a lodgment there as to enable him to recognize a chance genitive or dative.
Even where forms are not consistently distinguished by the same sub-word forms--for instance, where genitive plural functions are differentiated from other forms in the paradigm by means of a suffixal marker -arum in one declension and -um in another (as in Latin), it does not matter that these sub-word elements are phonologically distinct.
In a revision of her dissertation, Saric addresses the issue of the universality of the Determiner Phrase projection by looking at a rather peculiar behavior of nominalizations in Serbian--the so-called double adnominal genitive constructions--which some linguists have taken as evidence against Determiner Phrase in this Slavic language.
Five times in the extant corpus, Aristotle refers to a distinction between two ways of being a "that for the sake of which" that he sometimes marks by using genitive and dative pronouns.
It is thus that my mother tongue is called Dholuo (mouth of the Luo).In other words, according to the Luo, a language is simply a mouth (dhok) or, in genitive terms, dho (mouth of).
Noting that genitive NPs and reflexive possessives often control the converb.
The name is a noun in the genitive case," Nazari said in (http://zookeys.pensoft.net/articles.php?id=11411) the paper.
Some herb names contain internal inflection, such as names with genitive constructions, e.g.
For the preparation of species names as a tribute to a person, the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN 1999) defines, in Article 31.1.2: "A species-group name, if a noun in the genitive case formed directly from a modern personal name, is to be formed by adding to the stem of that name -i if the personal name is that of a man, -orum if of men or of man (men) and woman (women) together, -ae if of a woman, and -arum if of women; the stem of such a name is determined by the action of the original author when forming the genitive".
Thus Brunk rejects the now prominent view that by pistis Christou Paul intends to refer to Christ's own faith/faithfulness (the subjective genitive).