genocide

(redirected from genocidally)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to genocidally: Genocidal organization

gen·o·cide

 (jĕn′ə-sīd′)
n.
The systematic and widespread extermination or attempted extermination of a national, racial, religious, or ethnic group.

[Greek genos, race; see genə- in Indo-European roots + -cide.]

gen′o·cid′al (-sīd′l) adj.
gen′o·cid′al·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

genocide

(ˈdʒɛnəʊˌsaɪd)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the policy of deliberately killing a nationality or ethnic group
[C20: from geno-, from Greek genos race + -cide]
ˌgenoˈcidal adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

gen•o•cide

(ˈdʒɛn əˌsaɪd)

n.
the deliberate and systematic extermination of a national, racial, political, or cultural group.
[1940–45; < Greek géno(s) race + -cide]
gen`o•cid′al, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

genocide

1. the deliberate and systematic extermination of a racial or national group.
2. an actor in this process. — genocidal, adj.
See also: Race
the killing of an entire people or of a very large number of a people. — genocidal, adj.
See also: Killing
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.genocide - systematic killing of a racial or cultural group
kill, putting to death, killing - the act of terminating a life
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

genocide

noun massacre, killing, murder, slaughter, holocaust, ethnic cleansing (euphemistic), carnage, extermination, mass murder, annihilation, pogrom, butchery, mass slaughter They have alleged that acts of genocide and torture were carried out.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
إبادَه جَماعِيَّه
геноцид
genocida
folkemord
genocid
népirtásfajirtás
òjóîarmorîþjóðarmorð
genocidas
genocīds
ludobójstwo
genocída
genocid
genocid

genocide

[ˈdʒenəʊsaɪd] Ngenocidio m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

genocide

[ˈdʒɛnəsaɪd] ngénocide m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

genocide

nVölkermord m, → Genozid nt (geh)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

genocide

[ˈdʃɛnəʊˌsaɪd] ngenocidio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

genocide

(ˈdʒenəsaid) noun
the deliberate killing of a race of people.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

gen·o·cide

n. genocidio, exterminación sistemática de un grupo étnico.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Against this scenario, only such a counter-alliance of states broadly supported by civil society and human rights movements consisting of Rohingya survivors can put enough concrete pressure on the perpetrating regime and the genocidally racist society to allow Rohingya to live in peace on their own ancestral land of Northern Rakhine.
These are not lives being genocidally destroyed, but neither are they being entered into the life of the legitimate community in which standards of recognition permit for an attainment of humanness.
Native folk, nearly genocidally eliminated, but still surviving and seeking continuously to revive and revitalize some of their traditional memory of living close to the land, as well as continuously to fight for their rights of sovereignty, have much to say and much to teach that does not fit modern Western modes of thinking--even for those seeking to be "critical" and egalitarian (Stannard, 1992, x, 11; Tuck & Yang, 1-40).