gentilhomme

gentilhomme

(ʒãtijom)
n
a gentleman
[French]
References in classic literature ?
B., AMERICAIN, CATHOLIQUE, ET GENTILHOMME, as he was disposed to describe himself in moments of lofty expansion!
Valentin was what is called in France a gentilhomme, of the purest source, and his rule of life, so far as it was definite, was to play the part of a gentilhomme.
"et gentilhomme." I tugged at the bell pull and somewhere down below a bell rang as unexpected for Therese as a call from a ghost.
"Monsieur, you have the plighted faith of 'un gentilhomme Fran‡ais', for your safety," returned Montcalm, laying his hand impressively on his heart; "it should suffice."
Ah, what a high and noble appreciation of Gentlewomanhood there must have been in Vanity Fair, when that revered and august being was invested, by the universal acclaim of the refined and educated portion of this empire, with the title of Premier Gentilhomme of his Kingdom.
we had a portly, plumed gentilhomme of a Mephisto and a blond beauty of a Marguerite, living in a sylvan demeure that, like her, looked every bit as chaste et pure as the handsome cavalier of a transformed Faust described it.
(One reason why Moliere's play Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme is funny even before you read it, is that the title is an oxymoron.
Le lundi 25 avril a 18h30 a l'Institut francais d'Alger accueillera [beaucoup moins que] Le Bourgeois gentilhomme [beaucoup plus grand que] dans une version filmee.
"It reminds me of a play by Moliere (a great content provider from the 17th century), where an imposter taught 'prose' to a wealthy man (Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme)," he says.