gentilic


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gentilic

(dʒɛnˈtɪlɪk)
adj
derived from a place name that depicts the residents of that place
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Thus, the gentilic nouns, such as [phrase omitted], discussed on pp.
Often thought of as a fusion of German and Hebrew with some Slavic thrown into the mix, the language evokes a deep nostalgia for American Jews; in its weaving together of semitic and gentilic elements, the language seems to encapsulate the tension at the heart of modern Jewish existence and operates as a stand-in for feelings about Jewish Diaspora.
Namely, he places chivalric combat within a discourse of "gentilic" difference more pronounced and sophisticated than anything found in contemporary romances.
The book's utility is heightened by copious illustrations and plates (in the captions for plates Ila, IVa, b, Va, VIIb and IXa read "Kalhu") and four indices: a subject index, an index of geographic and gentilic names, an index of personal names, and an extremely useful index to the native terms studied by the various authors.
The author shows that the title rabianum when followed by a gentilic is a royal title and the bearer is not just a "sheikh" of a tribe (as this reviewer wrote, thirty years ago).
"to place, put"; see Muller-Kessler 2000b: 306-7; [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] "cast idol": correct to [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] or [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] "of cast metal," since the ending of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] M145:12 denotes a gentilic; mng.
Nisbe (or gentilic) forms of the noun and adjective occupy a third section (morphology, 148-49; syntax and usage, 149-50).
The length of the stem vowels of the Greek form [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] "Sidon," is assured by their filling the second spondee of Odyssey 15.425: [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] "on the one hand from Sidon." The length of the first vowel of the gentilic shows up in its occurrence in the first and second dectyls, respectively, of Iliad 6.290 and 291: [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] "(of the women)/the Sidonian ones, whom godlike Alexander (= Paris) himself/led from the Sidonian [territory]." The short vowel of the second syllable of the Greek gentilic may mirror the constant defective writing in Hebrew s[i.sup.y]don[i.sup.y] or may have been shortened for metrical reasons.
He identifies members of these units in the texts by various criteria: (a) groups or individuals labelled with a gentilic adjective (e.g., Ahlamu, Lullubian); (b) individuals with a personal name in a language distinctive of an ethnic group (e.g., Humban-napir an Elamite, Akap-Tilla a Hurrian, Meli-Sah a Kassite); (c) individuals with a personal name honoring a god specific to a particular people (e.g., Assur or Serua for Assyrians, Simut for Elamites); (d) individuals belonging to a known Kassite tribe or clan (e.g., Bit-Bazi, Bit-Habban).
With ay no longer a negative particle (producing Waterman's "not established") but the gentilic ending of the man's name, Parpola's translation reports that, "the palace overseer whom the king ...