gentility


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Related to gentility: politesse

gen·til·i·ty

 (jĕn-tĭl′ĭ-tē)
n.
1. The quality of being well-mannered; refinement.
2. The condition of being born to the gentry.
3. Persons of high social standing considered as a group.
4. An attempt to convey or maintain the appearance of refinement and elegance.

[Middle English gentilete, nobility of birth, from Old French, from Latin gentīlitās, from gentīlis, of the same clan; see gentle.]

gentility

(dʒɛnˈtɪlɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. respectability and polite good breeding
2. affected politeness
3. noble birth or ancestry
4. people of noble birth
[C14: from Old French gentilite, from Latin gentīlitās relationship of those belonging to the same tribe or family; see gens]

gen•til•i•ty

(dʒɛnˈtɪl ɪ ti)

n.
1. good breeding or refinement.
2. affected or pretentious politeness or elegance.
3. the condition or status of belonging to the gentry.
4. members of polite society collectively; the gentry.
[1300–50; Middle English < Old French < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gentility - elegance by virtue of fineness of manner and expressiongentility - elegance by virtue of fineness of manner and expression
elegance - a refined quality of gracefulness and good taste; "she conveys an aura of elegance and gentility"

gentility

noun refinement, culture, breeding, courtesy, elegance, formality, respectability, cultivation, rank, politeness, good manners, good family, blue blood, good breeding, high birth, courtliness, gentle birth The old woman had an air of gentility about her.

gentility

noun
Translations
تأنُّق شديد، دماثَه
uhlazenost
gode manerer
elõkelõsködés
hæverska; fínheit
manieringumas
manierīgums
kibarlıkzerafet

gentility

[dʒenˈtɪlɪtɪ] N [of person, family] → refinamiento m, elegancia f; [of place] → elegancia f

gentility

[dʒɛnˈtɪlɪti] ndistinction f

gentility

nVornehmheit f

gentility

[dʒɛnˈtɪlɪtɪ] n (see adj) → affettazione f, distinzione f

gentility

(dʒənˈtiləti) noun
good manners, often to too great an extent. She was laughed at for her gentility.
References in classic literature ?
His being a clergyman would be only for gentility's sake, and I think there is nothing more contemptible than such imbecile gentility.
A sort of shivering gentility had kept her aloof from the rest of her fellow-workers, but it took more than a shivering gentility to stave off Polly.
Hitherto, the life-blood has been gradually chilling in your veins as you sat aloof, within your circle of gentility, while the rest of the world was fighting out its battle with one kind of necessity or another.
No matter for the money," said she, giving him a little push towards the door; for her old gentility was contumaciously squeamish at sight of the copper coin, and, besides, it seemed such pitiful meanness to take the child's pocket-money in exchange for a bit of stale gingerbread.
Her sister asserted the family gentility by flouting the poor swain as he loitered about the prison for glimpses of his dear.
But this, to say the truth, is often too dearly purchased; and though it hath charms so inexpressible, that the French, perhaps, among other qualities, mean to express this, when they declare they know not what it is; yet its absence is well compensated by innocence; nor can good sense and a natural gentility ever stand in need of it.
She was ladylike, too, after the manner of the feminine gentility of those days; characterised by a certain state and dignity, rather than by the delicate, evanescent, and indescribable grace which is now recognised as its indication.
The boy, Leonard Bast, stood at the extreme verge of gentility.
Weston was a native of Highbury, and born of a respectable family, which for the last two or three generations had been rising into gentility and property.
If you intend to mar my plans for your establishment in life, and the preservation of that gentility and becoming pride, which our family have so long sustained--if, in short, you are resolved to take your own course, you must take it, and my curse with it.
Money must be so subservient to gentility as never to be worth a thought.
asked Angel Clare absently, as he turned over the newspaper he was reading at the little table to which he was always banished by Mrs Crick, in her sense of his gentility.