gentleman farmer

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gentleman farmer

n. pl. gentlemen farmers
A man of independent means who farms chiefly for pleasure rather than income.
Translations

gentleman farmer

nsignorotto di campagna
References in classic literature ?
Coleman has reported chiefly the expensive experiments of gentlemen farmers, my outgoes were,--
My father was one of those whom they call gentlemen farmers.
And before they knew it, these busy city boys were gentlemen farmers and the stars of their own reality TV series, The Fabulous Beckman Boys, which premieres June 16 on the Discovery network's Planet Green channel
Total sales (2007 = $2,314,675) have been increasing each year due to population increase of gentlemen farmers & horse population.
Sir Kyffin was born into a family of gentlemen farmers.
Later that year, a far less monumental incident in southern Ireland met with less antagonism when two gentlemen farmers decided one day to race each other on horseback across open country.
The area attracted wealthy gentlemen farmers and merchants who built country mansions.
The result is the calendar which showcases 12 of Kerry's most eligible gentlemen farmers.
96) But if this slow metamorphosis of the feudal nobility into gentlemen farmers stands behind Spenser's and Davies's almost reflex associations of civility and agriculture, their works likewise share the less gentrified social vision of the vernacular husbandry manuals and chronicle histories, which depict the freedom of small farmers to improve their social status by improving their land as the basis of national moral and economic well-being.
Bowman first examines the question of British influences on these landed aristocrats and gentlemen farmers and argues that those influences were particularly apparent in economic and ideological developments in the two regions.
Some of these gentlemen farmers and lawyers in the Eighteenth Century were fairly radical thinkers; a few were certifiable geniuses.
The stories of the first wave of Indians in California--as workers on the railroad, in lumber mills, and in lettuce fields; as victims of racist attacks; as members of the revolutionary Ghadr Party against British imperialism; as "Mexican-Hindus," the children of Sikh fathers and Mexican mothers; and as successful gentlemen farmers in the Imperial Valley--need to be told.