genuflection


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Related to genuflection: genuflexion

gen·u·flect

 (jĕn′yə-flĕkt′)
intr.v. gen·u·flect·ed, gen·u·flect·ing, gen·u·flects
1. To bend the knee or touch one knee to the floor or ground, as in worship.
2. To be servilely respectful or deferential; grovel.

[Late Latin genūflectere : Latin genū, knee; see genu- in Indo-European roots + Latin flectere, to bend.]

gen′u·flec′tion (-flĕk′shən) n.

genuflection, genuflexion

kneeling or bending the knee, especially in worship or reverence.
See also: Allegiance
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.genuflection - the act of bending the knees in worship or reverencegenuflection - the act of bending the knees in worship or reverence
bowing, obeisance, bow - bending the head or body or knee as a sign of reverence or submission or shame or greeting

genuflection

noun
An inclination of the head or body, as in greeting, consent, courtesy, submission, or worship:
Translations
knébeygingknéfall

genuflection

genuflexion (US) [dʒenjʊˈflekʃən] Ngenuflexión f

genuflection

, genuflexion
n (Rel) → Kniebeuge f
References in classic literature ?
Whereupon the pony went down on its knees in the sawdust in a genuflection to the man with the whip.
Having thus spoken, he crossed himself again and again, and after many genuflections and muttered prayers, he delivered the reliquary to Brother Ambrose, his attendant monk, while he himself swept up with less ceremony, but perhaps with no less internal satisfaction, the golden chain, and bestowed it in a pouch lined with perfumed leather, which opened under his arm.
He had, in truth, drunk very little--not a fourth of the quantity which a systematic tippler could carry to church on a Sunday afternoon without a hitch in his eastings of genuflections; but the weakness of Sir John's constitution made mountains of his petty sins in this kind.
The personage, but little reassured, and trembling in every limb, advanced to the edge of the marble table with a vast amount of bows, which, in proportion as he drew nearer, more and more resembled genuflections.
Newman watched their genuflections and gyrations with a grim, still enmity; they seemed aids and abettors of Madame de Cintre's desertion; they were mouthing and droning out their triumph.
The latest crease in its fold -- Jaswant Singh's open displeasure at being denied an election ticket -- has confirmed what was always a fact -- that the genuflection towards Modi is far from a unanimous party credo.
Courts justify dereliction of judicial duty as genuflection at the altar of majority rule, as long as the court can discern, or even imagine, a ''rational basis'' for any regulation -- even if the legislature never articulated it.
"If Europe is getting more immigrants than its voters want," Caldwell argues, "this is a good indication its democracy is malfunctioning." The response from the politicians and the broadcast media, especially the BBC, each time one of these polls is published is always the same: no consideration of stopping immigration or even a genuflection in the direction of perhaps, one day, merely reducing it, but a concerned debate about how we might educate the stupid public to be more welcoming to these wonderful and useful people.
Sentry (Kit Carlson, Colorado) 2008, exhibited at Knoedler, showed an even more pared-down scene: an oil pump jack, facing east, nodding up and down in silent genuflection. (These last two works were presented on LCD monitors set in minimalist iMac-like casings.)
Obama had already offered his genuflection, but on 4 June went further.
Beer heroes deserve a measure of genuflection, so let's bend the knee to the Sir John Fitzgerald company for flying the real ale flag in its North East pubs when others took the pasteurised, sterilised, homogenised, artificially-carbonated beer route; to the brave band of micro-brewers over the last 25 years who have leapt into the dark - and allowed many of us to see the light - and also to Tony Brookes, an entrepreneur with a social conscience, boundless energy and an exhausting "to do" list bursting with a million ideas.
If anything links the works Hughes chooses to direct, it is the theme of faith: "I'd better leave the realm of dog collars and genuflection sometime soon." But not until he helms Alfred Uhry's new one, "Edgardo Mine," based on the life of Pope Plus IX; it deals with "the absolute and unequivocal belief in God's will."