geochronology


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Related to geochronology: geomorphology, Geological time scale

ge·o·chro·nol·o·gy

 (jē′ō-krə-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The chronology of the earth's history as determined by geologic events.

ge′o·chron′o·log′ic (-krŏn′ə-lŏj′ĭk), ge′o·chron′o·log′i·cal adj.
ge′o·chron′o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
ge′o·chro·nol′o·gist n.

geochronology

(ˌdʒiːəʊkrəˈnɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Geological Science) the branch of geology concerned with ordering and dating of events in the earth's history, including the origin of the earth itself
geochronological, geochronologic adj

ge•o•chro•nol•o•gy

(ˌdʒi oʊ krəˈnɒl ə dʒi)

n.
the chronology of the earth, as based on both absolute and relative methods of age determination.
[1890–95]
ge`o•chron`o•log′ic (-ˌkrɒn lˈɒdʒ ɪk) ge`o•chron`o•log′i•cal, adj.
ge`o•chro•nol′o•gist, n.

geochronology

the branch of geology that describes the past in terms of geologic rather than human time. — geochronologist, n. — geochronologic, geochronological, adj.
See also: Earth
the chronology of the earth as induced from geologic data. — geochronologist, n.geochronologic, geochronological, adj.
See also: Time

geochronology

earth's history
Translations
géochronologie
References in periodicals archive ?
Warren Sharp, an expert on dating fossils at the Berkeley Geochronology Center in California, said the age of 210,000 years is "not well supported by the data."
I would say, with pretty high confidence, that the eruptions occurred within 50,000 years, and maybe 30,000 years, of the impact, which means they were synchronous within the margin of error," Paul Renne, a professor-in-residence of Earth and planetary science at UC Berkeley, director of the Berkeley Geochronology Center and senior author of the study, said.
I would say, with pretty high confidence, that the eruptions occurred within 50,000 years, and maybe 30,000 years, of the impact, which means they were synchronous within the margin of error," said Paul Renne, a professor-in-residence of earth and planetary science at UC Berkeley, director of the Berkeley Geochronology Center and senior author of the study, which will appear online Feb.
Among their topics are the provenance and alteration of feldspathic and quartzose sediments in southern Mexico: an application of Krynine's hypothesis on second-cycle arkose, the paleomagnetism and rotation history of the Blue Mountains in Oregon, Late Cenozoic uplift and shortening in the central California Coast Ranges and the development of the San Joaquin Basin foreland, local-to-distance provenance cyclicity of the southern Front Range in central Colorado: insights from detrial zircon geochronology, and Cenozoic basin evolution in the Indus-Yarlung suture zone and High Himalaya.
The idea was first proposed back in 1973 by a geologist named William White, but no-one took him seriously, said C Brenhin Keller of the Berkeley Geochronology Center, who led the study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Geology (Structural Geology, Petrology, Geochemistry, Geophysics, Sedimentology, Geohydrology, Geochronology, Mineralogy, Physical Geology, Marine Geology, Environmental Geology, Palaeontology, Geology of Energy Resources: Uranium, Coal, Petroleum)
The team of researchers for the find comprises Shanti Pappu & Kumar Akhilesh (archaeologists: directing the project), Yanni Gunnell (University of Lyon, geomorphologist), A.K.Singhvi, Haresh Rajapara and A.D.Shukla from the Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad, India (responsible for the geochronology).
Liu et al., "Geochronology and fluid inclusion study of the Jiguanshan porphyry Mo deposit, Inner Mongolia," Acta Petrologica Sinica, vol.