geodesy

(redirected from geodesists)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to geodesists: geodetic, Geodetic Point

ge·od·e·sy

 (jē-ŏd′ĭ-sē)
n.
The geologic science of the size and shape of the earth.

[New Latin geōdaesia, from Greek geōdaisiā : geō-, geo- + daiesthai, to divide; see dā- in Indo-European roots.]

ge·od′e·sist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

geodesy

(dʒɪˈɒdɪsɪ) or

geodetics

n
(Geological Science) the branch of science concerned with determining the exact position of geographical points and the shape and size of the earth
[C16: from French géodésie, from Greek geōdaisia, from geo- + daiein to divide]
geˈodesist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ge•od•e•sy

(dʒiˈɒd ə si)

also ge•o•det•ics

(ˌdʒi əˈdɛt ɪks)

n.
the branch of applied mathematics that deals with the measurement of the shape and area of large tracts of country, the exact position of geographical points, and the curvature, shape, and dimensions of the earth.
[1560–70; < French géodésie < Greek geōdaisía=geō- geo- + -daisia, derivative of daíein to divide, distribute]
ge•od′e•sist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

geodesy

the branch of applied mathematics that studies the measurement and shape and area of large tracts, the exact position of geographical points, and the curvature, shape, and dimensions of the earth. Also called geodetics. — geodesist, n. — geodetic, geodetical, adj.
See also: Mathematics
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

geodesy

The scientific study of the size and shape of the Earth.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.geodesy - the branch of geology that studies the shape of the earth and the determination of the exact position of geographical pointsgeodesy - the branch of geology that studies the shape of the earth and the determination of the exact position of geographical points
geophysical science, geophysics - geology that uses physical principles to study properties of the earth
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
geodézie

geodesy

[dʒiːˈɒdɪsɪ] Ngeodesia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

geodesy

nGeodäsie f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
'That is simply because more measurement data are available for Western countries.' Geodesists (researchers who focus on determining the shape and dimensions of the earth's surface) have known for a long time that there can be large differences between this gravitational model and the local sea level.
They are supported by geodesists, veterinary doctors and foresters.
means that geodesists are faced with the continuing challenge of keeping
As technology advances, volcanologists and experts in collecting and interpreting satellite data (including remote-sensing scientists and geodesists) are improving our ability to predict eruptions.
They include not only archaeologists and students of archaeology but also architects, geodesists, restorers, numismatists, and representatives of many other interdisciplinary fields.
Thanks to their improvements in accuracy (now of the order of millimeters, see Elosegui et al., 2006) and their high sampling rate (up to 50 Hz, see Genrich and Bock, 2006) GnSS stations are increasingly becoming important tools, not only for geodesists but also for seismologists.
In practice, geodesists who perform cadastral measurements of land plots using more accurate tools are certain that it would be more purposeful to find a limit not to be crossed, as it is done when area is measured (permissible deviation of area).
Adler, Map Projections for Geodesists, Cartographers and Geographers, North-Holland, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 1972.
The measurements were made by experts - geodesists. In the following, measurements of two silos have been presented:
AoIf you donAAEt get there till, say, two or three weeks afterwards, youAAEve missed an important part of the signal, so everybody has a sense of urgency.Ao The first arrivals have been geophysicists and geodesists, scientists who study the curvature and movement of the Earth.
Swiss geodesists, who have already been measuring the Alps with highest accuracy for decades, have observed, however, that the Alp summits, as compared to low land, rise up to one millimetre per year.