geolinguistics


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to geolinguistics: linguistic geography

geolinguistics

(ˌdʒiːəʊlɪŋˈɡwɪstɪks)
n
(Linguistics) the study of the geographical distribution of languages

geolinguistics

the study or science of linguistics in relation to geography. — geolinguist, n. — geolinguistic, adj.
See also: Linguistics
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
"The Term 'Cross' in Ernest Hemingway's The Garden of Eden." Recent Research in Geolinguistics, volume 2.
Their topics include the so-called prefixes of Tibeto-Burman and why they are so called, dialect diversity and language resilience: the geolinguistics of Phuza vitality, medial changes in Jino dialects, the morphology of numerals and classifiers in Japhug, the characteristics of the Karen branch of Tibeto-Burman, and the diachronic origins of converbs in Tibeto-Burman and beyond.
Lauri Kettunen's material on the Veps language is of great importance in the field of geolinguistics. They can be found on the website of the Centre of National Languages of Finland (see VVS).
The geolinguistics of English as an academic lingua franca: Citation practices across English-medium national and English-medium international journals.
Although the language is crucially important for linguists, Scollon and Scollon have not used the term 'geolinguistics'.
"Scale as an Influence on the Geolinguistic Analysis of a Minority Language." Discussion Papers in Geolinguistics 4: 1-16.
I gave one other academic talk, "The Superiority of English as a Vehicle for Wordplay" at New York University on April 20 1985, as part of the 20th anniversary celebration of the American Society of Geolinguistics. I argued for English on several grounds: its extremely large stock of words, its polyglot nature, its statistical structure (not well understood, but manifested by such facts as the greater difficulty of constructing crossword puzzles in Italian), and its syntax (Petr Beckmann's view of language as an error-detecting and error-correcting code).
In fact, once upon a time, I too was guilty of pushing out my share of educrap in the field of geolinguistics. You state in your Obama Akbar editorial that "more than 30 states have introduced legislation or enacted laws aimed at keeping voters from the polls" without noting that perhaps most of those efforts were aimed at keeping illegals, not blacks, from voting.
The Atlas project synthesizes culture-specific goals (the internal structure of the geolinguistics and cultural study of Lithuanian Yiddish) with more general issues, including possibilities for in situ mapping of language and culture after near-total destruction of the relevant population, based on the sporadic location of very aged "mohicans".