geologian

geologian

(dʒiːəˈləʊdʒən)
n
(Geological Science) an obsolete form of geologist
References in periodicals archive ?
Helmuth frequently quotes Berry, a self-labeled "geologian," whom he met in 1987 when both men were asked to be presenters at a conference on Christianity and ecology
My investigation of Doyle's ecosocial justice pedagogy, including its imbrication in settler-colonial dynamics, centres around his evolving engagement with three key concepts: "deep ecology," "ecopoesis," and "geologian." Coined by Arne Naess in 1972, "deep ecology" refers, broadly, to the politically committed life ethic rooted in the belief that non-human organisms have inalienable rights to life and biological integrity, "independent of the usefulness of the nonhuman world for narrow human purposes" (Naess 37).
Mary Evelyn Tucker and John Grim present a collection of priest and religious geologian Thomas BerryAEs writings on the ouniverse story,o exploring the world-changing implications of contemporary science, and other subjects.
P., a Catholic priest whose studies moved from Western history to Asian traditions and indigenous religion as he came to consider himself a "geologian." As chair of the History of Religions Department at Fordham University, Bronx, NY, his preoccupation with ecological destruction inspired students of various religions to begin to explore the resources of the non-Christian traditions.
Haikio, Turvetutkimusten MaastO-Opas, Opas N:012, Geologian tutkimuskeskus, Espoo, Finland, 1984, Finnish.
Among the authors here ambivalence about modern science becomes apparent: on one hand, "geologian" Thomas Berry (1914-2009) chided fellow Christians for failing to see the "religious value" of the scientific vision of the universe (p.
Two docents who help broaden our discussion of alternative energies in light of our current ecological malaise are pioneering ecologist Aldo Leopold (1887-1948), and cultural historian and "geologian" Thomas Berry (1914-2009).
A Passionist priest and self-described cosmologist and "geologian," he came down firmly on the side of environmentalism and was a pioneer in the field after a revelatory, mystical experience with nature in his youth set his feet on the path.
"The Christian Future and the Fate of Earth" takes a Christian approach to environmental discussion, from self-titled geologian Thomas Berry.
(47) More ambivalently, geologian Thomas Berry calls it the end of the Cenozoic Age of planetary flourishing and the precipitous dawn of the Ecological Age when humankind, for the sake of survival, is challenged to learn a new mode of being on and with and as the Earth.
While by all means we can and should work with the West in tackling environmental problems, including appropriating and integrating some of their eco-techniques into our socioreligious contexts, we have to: (1) be frank in emphasizing the radical ethico-spiritual shift rather than the superficial technoeconomic approach and thereby propose and implement solutions accordingly; and (2) systematically ground all our environmental work on authentic Islamic eco-ethical principles as outlined above (138) instead of submitting passively to alienating secular eco-philosophical categories (like the so-called Gaia hypothesis or the evolutionary "geologian" ecosophy of Thomas Berry (139)) incompatible with the metaphysics and worldview of Islam.