geologic time


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geologic time

geologic time

n.
The period of time covering the physical formation and development of Earth, especially the period prior to human history.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ge′olog′ic time′


n.
the succession of eras, periods, and epochs as considered in historical geology.
[1860–65]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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ge·o·log·ic time

(jē′ə-lŏj′ĭk)
The period of time covering the formation and development of the Earth, from about 4.6 billion years ago to today.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.geologic time - the time of the physical formation and development of the earth (especially prior to human history)geologic time - the time of the physical formation and development of the earth (especially prior to human history)
time - the continuum of experience in which events pass from the future through the present to the past
eon, aeon - the longest division of geological time
geological period, period - a unit of geological time during which a system of rocks formed; "ganoid fishes swarmed during the earlier geological periods"
geological era, era - a major division of geological time; an era is usually divided into two or more periods
epoch - a unit of geological time that is a subdivision of a period and is itself divided into ages
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
The water was quite free from reptiles, and the vegetation upon the banks of the river had altered to more open and parklike forest, with eucalyptus and acacia mingled with a scattering of tree ferns, as though two distinct periods of geologic time had overlapped and merged.
Together, the two books complement one another, revealing Darwin's growing understanding of Earth function, the implicated depth of geologic time, and the relationships of past biotas to those of today.
Blending classic stories of descent into the underworld--the Epic of Gilgamesh and the Aeneid, for example --with his own lucid stories of his experiences in geologic time, Macfarlane poetically concludes that "darkness might be a medium of vision, and descent may be a movement toward revelation rather than deprivation." He discovers that every culture places into the underland "that which we fear and wish to lose, and that which we love and wish to save." As Macfarlane descends through some of these narrow passages in search of enlightenment, we often hold our breath and feel our hearts racing, but when he emerges we see with him the beauty of the world beneath our feet.
Use a geologic time scale to explain how scientists think an asteroid that hit Earth affected dinosaurs.
Over geologic time periods, there is a balancing act between the CO2 emitted from volcanoes and CO2 consumed through chemical reactions with rocks.
By 2030, Earth's climate is expected to resemble that of the mid-Pliocene, going back more than three million years in geologic time, according to the study published in the journal PNAS.
While Earth's tectonics and other forces have erased most evidence of its early history, much of Mars -- about one-third the size of Earth -- is believed to have remained largely static over the eons, creating a geologic time machine for scientists.
For years, scientists have known the earliest microbes came to be billions of years ago, while multicellular organisms didn't appear on the geologic time scales until the end of Proterozoic Eon - the time from 2.5 billion years ago to 541 million years ago.
Other topics include the thermal conductivity of Earth's core: a key geophysical parameter's constraints and uncertainties, controls on O2 production in cyanobacterial mats and implications for Earth's oxygenation, subduction orogeny and the Late Cenozoic evolution of the Mediterranean arcs, time not our time: physical controls on the preservation and measurement of geologic time, and responses of the tropical atmospheric circulation to climate change and connection to the hydrological cycle.
While Earth's tectonics and other forces have erased most evidence of its early history, much of Mars-- about one-third the size of Earth -- is believed to have remained relatively static for more than 3 billion years, creating a geologic time machine for scientists.

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