geology


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ge·ol·o·gy

 (jē-ŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. ge·ol·o·gies
1. The scientific study of the origin, history, and structure of the earth.
2. The structure of a specific region of the earth's crust.
3. A book on geology.
4. The scientific study of the origin, history, and structure of the solid matter of a celestial body.

[Medieval Latin geōlogia, study of earthly things : Greek geō-, geo- + Greek -logiā, -logy.]

ge′o·log′ic (jē′ə-lŏj′ĭk), ge′o·log′i·cal adj.
ge′o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
ge·ol′o·gist n.

geology

(dʒɪˈɒlədʒɪ)
n
1. (Geological Science) the scientific study of the origin, history, structure, and composition of the earth
2. (Geological Science) the geological features of a district or country
geological, ˌgeoˈlogic adj
ˌgeoˈlogically adv
geˈologist, geˈologer n

ge•ol•o•gy

(dʒiˈɒl ə dʒi)

n., pl. -gies.
1. the science that deals with the dynamics and physical history of the earth, the rocks of which it is composed, and the physical, chemical, and biological changes that the earth has undergone or is undergoing.
2. the geologic features and processes occurring in a given area or region: the geology of the Andes.
3. the study of the rocks and other physical features of the moon, planets, and other celestial bodies.
4. a book dealing with geology, esp. a textbook.
[1680–90]

ge·ol·o·gy

(jē-ŏl′ə-jē)
1. The scientific study of the origin of the Earth along with its rocks, minerals, and land forms, and of the history of the changes these have undergone.
2. The structure of a specific region of the Earth, including its rocks, soils, mountains, fossils, and other features.

Geology


the use of aerial observation and photography in the study of geological features. — aerogeologist, n.aerogeologic, aerogeological, adj.
the branch of geology concerned with the adaptability of land to agriculture, soil quality, etc.
metamorphism from simple to more complex minerals, usually occurring deep beneath the earth’s surface. See also katamorphism, metamorphism. — anamorphic, anamorphotic, adj.
a minuteness of rock texture so fine that individual grains are invisible to the naked eye. — aphanite, n.
the branch of geology that studies the geological formations of the remote past. — archeogeologic, archaeogeologic, archeogeological, archaeogeological, adj.
the formation of breccia, or masses of rock composed of fragments of older rock fused together.
a thunderstone or meteoric rock.
the theory that geological changes have been caused by sudden upheaval rather than by gradual and continuing processes. Cf. uniformitarianism.catastrophist, n.
the measurement of the elevations and slopes of mineral strata or of cuttings into rock formations. — clinometer, n.clinometric, clinometrical, adj.
a small mass of rock composed of the petrified fecal remains of animals.
the study of surface of the earth or the moon.
the process of movement that causes the earth’s crust to form continents, mountains, etc. — diastrophic, adj.
a geological theory that maintains that some geological phenomena can be explained by extensive flooding of large areas of the earth’s surface or by an equally strong condition of the weather.
the vertical movement or tilting of the earth’s crust, affecting broad expanses of continents. — epeirogenic, epeirogenetic, adj.
the process of metamorphism. See also biology; disease and illness. — epigenetic, adj.
one who considers geological phenomena to be the result of the action of streams.
a branch of geology that studies the constituent parts of the earth, its atmosphere and water, its crust, and its interior condition. — geognosist, geognost, n.geognostic, adj.
the branch of geology that studies the structure of the earth’s crust; structural geology. Also called geotectonics.geotectonic, adj.
the branch of geology that measures temperatures deep below the surface of the earth; geologic thermometry.
the branch of geology that studies the nature, distribution, and movement of glaciers and their effects upon the earth’s topography. — glaciologist, n.glaciological, adj.
the condition of being arranged in the same way, especially stratified layers that are similar in arrangement and place but not contemporaneous. — homotaxic, adj.
the study of water both on and beneath the earth’s surface. — hydrogeological, adj.
the general equality of pressure in the crust of the earth. — isostatic, adj.
metamorphism from complex to simpler minerals, usually occurring at or near the earth’s surface. See also anamorphism, metamorphism.katamorphic, adj.
a small stone ejected by a volcano.
the branch of geology that studies ponds and lakes. — limnologist, n.
the process by which loose mineral fragments or particles of sand are solidifled into stone.
the science of explaining the minerals of which the earth is composed, their origins, and the cause of their form and arrangement.
Rare. the study of rocks.
the branch of geology that studies the mineral composition and structure of rocks, usu. macroscopically. Cf. petrography.lithologic, lithological, adj.
a rock or stone formed by natural processes in such a way that it appears to have been artificially fashioned.
1. the process of change in the form and structure of rocks by the agency of heat, water, and pressure.
2. the change of particular types of rock, as limestone into marble. Also called epigenesis. See also change. — metamorphic, adj.
the process of chemical change in rocks or other mineral masses that results in the formation of new rocks or minerals. Also metasomatosis.
1. a very small isotropic needlelike crystal, found usually in volcanic rocks.
2. a very small stone tooi or part of a tool, as a tooth of a primitive saw. — microlithic, adj.
the branch of geology that studies the physical and chemical structures of minerals. — mineralogist, n.mineralogic, mineralogical, adj.
the now obsolete theory that all rock surfaces were formed by the agency of water. Cf. plutonism. — neptunist, n.
the process by which mountains are created. — orogenic, orogenetic, adj.
mineralogy. Also called oryctognosy.
a branch of soil science that studies the soils of past geologie times. — paleopedologist, palaeopaedologist, n.paleopedologic, palaeopaedologic, paleopedological, palaeopaedological, adj.
a phenomenon in which one mineral encloses another. — perimorphic, perimorphous, adj.
the branch of petrology that studies the formation of rocks.
the branch of geology that describes and classifies rocks, usually after microscopic study. Cf. lithology. — petrographer, n.petrographic, petrographical, adj.
the branch of geology that studies the origin, structure, composition, changing, and classification of rocks. — petrologist, n.petrologic, petrological, adj.
the theory that all rock surfaces have solidified from magmas, some at great depths below the surface of the earth. Cf. neptunism.plutonist, n.
the process by which ores and minerals are formed from the action of vapors produced by igneous magmas. — pneumatolytic, adj.
the study of iron or copper sulfides, called pyrites.
the layer of disintegrated and decomposed rock fragments, including soil, lying above the solid rock of the earth’s crust. Also called mantle rock.
the branch of geology that studies the classification, correlation, and interpretation of stratified rocks. — stratigrapher, n.stratigraphic, stratigraphical, adj.
the study of the structure and behavior of the earth’s crust. — tectonic, adj.
the thesis that early geological processes were not unlike those observed today, i.e., gradually occurring. Cf. catastrophism.uniformitarian, n.
a fragment of rock embedded in another kind of rock.

geology

1. The study of the origins, structure, and composition of the earth.
2. The scientific study of the Earth, especially its rocks and minerals and their development.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.geology - a science that deals with the history of the earth as recorded in rocksgeology - a science that deals with the history of the earth as recorded in rocks
exceedance - (geology) the probability that an earthquake will generate a level of ground motion that exceeds a specified reference level during a given exposure time; "the concept of exceedance can be applied to any type of environmental risk modeling"
principle of superposition, superposition principle, superposition - (geology) the principle that in a series of stratified sedimentary rocks the lowest stratum is the oldest
earth science - any of the sciences that deal with the earth or its parts
hypsography - the scientific study of the earth's configuration above sea level (emphasizing the measurement of land altitudes relative to sea level)
palaeogeology, paleogeology - the study of geologic features once at the surface of the earth but now buried beneath rocks
geophysical science, geophysics - geology that uses physical principles to study properties of the earth
orography, orology - the science of mountains
stratigraphy - the branch of geology that studies the arrangement and succession of strata
mineralogy - the branch of geology that studies minerals: their structure and properties and the ways of distinguishing them
spelaeology, speleology - the scientific study of caves
economic geology - the branch of geology that deals with economically valuable geological materials
crustal movement, tectonic movement - movement resulting from or causing deformation of the earth's crust
heave - (geology) a horizontal dislocation
uplift, upthrow, upthrust, upheaval - (geology) a rise of land to a higher elevation (as in the process of mountain building)
slide - (geology) the descent of a large mass of earth or rocks or snow etc.
fault line - (geology) line determined by the intersection of a geological fault and the earth's surface
bed - (geology) a stratum of rock (especially sedimentary rock); "they found a bed of sandstone"
clast - (geology) a constituent fragment of a clastic rock
clastic rock - (geology) a rock composed of broken pieces of older rocks
diapir - a domed rock formation where a core of rock has moved upward and pierced through the more brittle overlying strata
esker - (geology) a long winding ridge of post glacial gravel and other sediment; deposited by meltwater from glaciers or ice sheets
faulting, geological fault, fracture, break, fault, shift - (geology) a crack in the earth's crust resulting from the displacement of one side with respect to the other; "they built it right over a geological fault"; "he studied the faulting of the earth's crust"
geological formation, formation - (geology) the geological features of the earth
Great Rift Valley - ( geology) a depression in southwestern Asia and eastern Africa; extends from the valley of the Jordan River to Mozambique; marked by geological faults
kettle hole, kettle - (geology) a hollow (typically filled by a lake) that results from the melting of a mass of ice trapped in glacial deposits
Moho, Mohorovicic discontinuity - the boundary between the Earth's crust and the underlying mantle; "the Mohorovicic discontinuity averages 5 miles down under oceans and 20 miles down under continents"
peneplain, peneplane - a more or less level land surface representing an advanced stage of erosion undisturbed by crustal movements
scablands - (geology) flat elevated land with poor soil and little vegetation that is scarred by dry channels of glacial origin (especially in eastern Washington)
sill - (geology) a flat (usually horizontal) mass of igneous rock between two layers of older sedimentary rock
xenolith - (geology) a piece of rock of different origin from the igneous rock in which it is embedded
geological phenomenon - a natural phenomenon involving the structure or composition of the earth
accretion - (geology) an increase in land resulting from alluvial deposits or waterborne sediment
eating away, eroding, erosion, wearing, wearing away - (geology) the mechanical process of wearing or grinding something down (as by particles washing over it)
foliation - (geology) the arrangement of leaflike layers in a rock
geologic process, geological process - (geology) a natural process whereby geological features are modified
deflation - (geology) the erosion of soil as a consequence of sand and dust and loose rocks being removed by the wind; "a constant deflation of the desert landscape"
saltation - (geology) the leaping movement of sand or soil particles as they are transported in a fluid medium over an uneven surface
superposition - (geology) the deposition of one geological stratum on another
Mercalli scale - a scale formerly used to describe the magnitude of an earthquake; an earthquake detected only by seismographs is a I and an earthquake that destroys all buildings is a XII

geology

noun see layers of the earth's crust

Geology

Geological eras  Cenozoic, Mesozoic, Palaeozoic, Precambrian
Geological periods  Quaternary, Tertiary, Cretaceous, Jurassic, Triassic, Permian, Carboniferous, Devonian, Silurian, Ordovician, Cambrian
Epochs of the Cenozoic era  Holocene, Pleistocene, Pliocene, Miocene, Oligocene, Eocene, Palaeocene
Translations
جيولوجياجيولوجيا، علم طبقات الأرض
geologie
geologi
geologia
geologija
geológiaföldtan
jarðfræðijarîfræîi
地質学
지질학
geologia
geologasgeologijageologinisgeologiškai
ģeolo-ģija
geológia
geologija
geologi
ธรณีวิทยา
jeolojiyerbilim
địa chất

geology

[dʒɪˈɒlədʒɪ] Ngeología f

geology

[dʒiˈɒlədʒi] ngéologie f

geology

nGeologie f

geology

[dʒɪˈɒlədʒɪ] ngeologia

geology

(dʒiˈolədʒi) noun
the science of the history and development of the Earth as shown by rocks etc. He is studying geology.
geological (dʒiəˈlodʒikəl) adjective
a geological survey.
ˌgeoˈlogically adverb
geˈologist noun

geology

جيولوجيا geologie geologi Geologie γεωλογία geología geologia géologie geologija geologia 地質学 지질학 geologie geologi geologia geologia геология geologi ธรณีวิทยา jeoloji địa chất 地质学
References in classic literature ?
This volume contains, in the form of a Journal, a history of our voyage, and a sketch of those observations in Natural History and Geology, which I think will possess some interest for the general reader.
And yet the former history continues to be studied side by side with the laws of statistics, geography, political economy, comparative philology, and geology, which directly contradict its assumptions.
But that neat idea hit the boy in a blank place, for geology hadn't been invented yet.
I had forgotten what little geology I had studied at school--about all that remained was an impression of horror that the illustrations of restored prehistoric monsters had made upon me, and a well-defined belief that any man with a pig's shank and a vivid imagination could "restore" most any sort of paleolithic monster he saw fit, and take rank as a first class paleontologist.
The leave of absence which you have asked for the purpose of enabling you to carry into execution your designs of exploring the country to the Rocky Mountains, and beyond with a view of assertaining the nature and character of the various tribes of Indians inhabiting those regions; the trade which might be profitably carried on with them, the quality of the soil, the productions, the minerals, the natural history, the climate, the Geography, and Topography, as well as Geology of the various parts of the Country within the limits of the Territories belonging to the United States, between our frontier, and the Pacific; has been duly considered, and submitted to the War Department, for approval, and has been sanctioned.
Here may spring up new and mongrel races, like new formations in geology, the amalgamation of the "debris" and "abrasions" of former races, civilized and savage; the remains of broken and almost extinguished tribes; the descendants of wandering hunters and trappers; of fugitives from the Spanish and American frontiers; of adventurers and desperadoes of every class and country, yearly ejected from the bosom of society into the wilderness.
Mac also developed a geological mania, and went tapping about at rocks and stones, discoursing wisely of "strata, periods, and fossil remains"; while Rose picked up leaves and lichens, and gave him lessons in botany in return for his lectures on geology.
So we talked about painting, poetry, and music, theology, geology, and philosophy: once or twice I lent her a book, and once she lent me one in return: I met her in her walks as often as I could; I came to her house as often as I dared.
Natural selection can act only by the preservation and accumulation of infinitesimally small inherited modifications, each profitable to the preserved being; and as modern geology has almost banished such views as the excavation of a great valley by a single diluvial wave, so will natural selection, if it be a true principle, banish the belief of the continued creation of new organic beings, or of any great and sudden modification in their structure.
To me, at least in my present circumstances, these would be vastly more interesting than this spectacle of oldtime geology in decay.
That such a time existed, we have evidences in geology, but there only; we can never expect proofs such as this age demands.
Photography has given us proofs of the incomparable beauty of our satellite; all is known regarding the moon which mathematical science, astronomy, geology, and optics can learn about her.