geomagnetic pole


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geomagnetic pole

n.
Either of the two points on the earth's surface where the earth's magnetic field is most intense and toward which a magnetic compass needle ideally points. The north and south geomagnetic poles are located near the north and south geographic poles, respectively. Because opposite magnetic poles attract, the geomagnetic north pole is a magnetic south pole and vice versa.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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We will use these to compare the auroral oval's size with direct measurements of Earth's magnetism (surface field strength and position of the geomagnetic pole) made since the early 19th century.
Jock, of Kingston-upon-Thames, London, was part of the first unsupported team to trek to the North Geomagnetic pole. He has also rowed the Atlantic and been world champ in different yachting classes.
The natural light displays occur most frequently in the Polar Regions, centered within a 2500 km radius of the geomagnetic pole. Sunspots on the Sun's surface are the predominant cause for the appearance of the Northern Lights.
Mr Gauntlett, who was also a keen cyclist, continued to take on extreme challenges and in March 2007, he and Mr Hooper set off on a journey from the North Geomagnetic Pole to the South Magnetic Pole using entirely human and natural power.
Ice Warrior project leader Jim McNeill announced the team had completed their expedition and had made it to the Geomagnetic pole.
The North Magnetic Pole is where the Earth's geomagnetic field points directly downwards, while the North Geomagnetic Pole is the northern end of the axis of the magnetosphere, the geomagnetic field that surrounds the Earth and extends into space.
The expedition, to the geomagnetic pole, is now scheduled for the end of March.
The geomagnetic pole is a mathematically-defined position, which differs from the shifting magnetic north pole - by which compasses are set - and from the poles on which the earth rotates.
At present, the wandering north geomagnetic pole is 78.5 [degrees] N and 69 [degrees] W, some half the distance from the north pole that it was during the 14th century.
Several recent papers point out that the virtual geomagnetic pole paths coincide with the two high-velocity regions circumscribing the Pacific and, effectively, connect the North and South poles.
A popular misconception is that the northern lights appear strongest right at the geomagnetic pole. In reality, auroras usually occur in a giant ring roughly 4,000 kilometers (2,500 miles) wide that surrounds each of the geomagnetic poles.