geometry

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ge·om·e·try

 (jē-ŏm′ĭ-trē)
n. pl. ge·om·e·tries
1.
a. The mathematics of the properties, measurement, and relationships of points, lines, angles, surfaces, and solids.
b. A system of geometry: Euclidean geometry.
c. A geometry restricted to a class of problems or objects: solid geometry.
d. A book on geometry.
2.
a. Configuration; arrangement.
b. A surface shape.
3. A physical arrangement suggesting geometric forms or lines.

[Middle English geometrie, from Old French, from Latin geōmetria, from Greek geōmetriā, from geōmetrein, to measure land : geō-, geo- + metron, measure; see mē- in Indo-European roots.]

ge·om′e·tri′cian (jē-ŏm′ĭ-trĭsh′ən, jē′ə-mĭ-), ge·om′e·ter n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

geometry

(dʒɪˈɒmɪtrɪ)
n
1. (Mathematics) the branch of mathematics concerned with the properties, relationships, and measurement of points, lines, curves, and surfaces. See also analytical geometry, non-Euclidean geometry
2. (Mathematics)
a. any branch of geometry using a particular notation or set of assumptions: analytical geometry.
b. any branch of geometry referring to a particular set of objects: solid geometry.
3. a shape, configuration, or arrangement
4. (Art Terms) arts the shape of a solid or a surface
[C14: from Latin geōmetria, from Greek, from geōmetrein to measure the land]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ge•om•e•try

(dʒiˈɒm ɪ tri)

n.
1. the branch of mathematics that deals with the deduction of the properties, measurement, and relationships of points, lines, angles, and figures in space.
2. any specific system of this that operates in accordance with a specific set of assumptions: Euclidean geometry.
3. a book on geometry, esp. a textbook.
4. the shape or form of a surface or solid.
5. a design or arrangement of objects in simple rectilinear or curvilinear form.
[1300–50; Middle English < Latin geōmetria < Greek geōmetría. See geo-, -metry]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ge·om·e·try

(jē-ŏm′ĭ-trē)
The mathematical study of the properties, measurement, and relationships of points, lines, planes, surfaces, angles, and solids.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

geometry

the branch of mathematics that treats the measurement, relationship, and properties of points, lines, angles, and flgures in space. — geometer, geometrician, n. — geometric, geometrical, adj.
See also: Mathematics
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.geometry - the pure mathematics of points and lines and curves and surfacesgeometry - the pure mathematics of points and lines and curves and surfaces
superposition - (geometry) the placement of one object ideally in the position of another one in order to show that the two coincide
duality - (geometry) the interchangeability of the roles of points and planes in the theorems of projective geometry
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
pure mathematics - the branches of mathematics that study and develop the principles of mathematics for their own sake rather than for their immediate usefulness
affine geometry - the geometry of affine transformations
elementary geometry, Euclidean geometry, parabolic geometry - (mathematics) geometry based on Euclid's axioms
fractal geometry - (mathematics) the geometry of fractals; "Benoit Mandelbrot pioneered fractal geometry"
non-Euclidean geometry - (mathematics) geometry based on axioms different from Euclid's; "non-Euclidean geometries discard or replace one or more of the Euclidean axioms"
spherical geometry - (mathematics) the geometry of figures on the surface of a sphere
analytic geometry, analytical geometry, coordinate geometry - the use of algebra to study geometric properties; operates on symbols defined in a coordinate system
plane geometry - the geometry of 2-dimensional figures
solid geometry - the geometry of 3-dimensional space
descriptive geometry, projective geometry - the geometry of properties that remain invariant under projection
plane section, section - (geometry) the area created by a plane cutting through a solid
pencil - a figure formed by a set of straight lines or light rays meeting at a point
conic, conic section - (geometry) a curve generated by the intersection of a plane and a circular cone
eccentricity - (geometry) a ratio describing the shape of a conic section; the ratio of the distance between the foci to the length of the major axis; "a circle is an ellipse with zero eccentricity"
foursquare, square - (geometry) a plane rectangle with four equal sides and four right angles; a four-sided regular polygon; "you can compute the area of a square if you know the length of its sides"
angle of inclination, inclination - (geometry) the angle formed by the x-axis and a given line (measured counterclockwise from the positive half of the x-axis)
diagonal - (geometry) a straight line connecting any two vertices of a polygon that are not adjacent
translate - change the position of (figures or bodies) in space without rotation
construct - draw with suitable instruments and under specified conditions; "construct an equilateral triangle"
inscribe - draw within a figure so as to touch in as many places as possible
circumscribe - to draw a geometric figure around another figure so that the two are in contact but do not intersect
truncate - replace a corner by a plane
congruent - coinciding when superimposed
incongruent - not congruent
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
هندسَه
geometrie
geometri
geomeetria
geometria
रेखा गणित
geometrija
mértangeometria
rúmfræîi
幾何学
기하학
geometrijageometrinisgeometriškai
ģeometrija
geometria
geometrija
geometri

geometry

[dʒɪˈɒmɪtrɪ] Ngeometría f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

geometry

[dʒiˈɒmɪtri] n
(MATHEMATICS)géométrie f
(= layout) [thing, place] → géométrie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

geometry

n (Math) → Geometrie f; geometry set (→ Zirkelkasten mmit) → Zeichengarnitur f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

geometry

[dʒɪˈɒmɪtrɪ] ngeometria
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

geometry

(dʒiˈomətri) noun
a branch of mathematics dealing with the study of lines, angles etc. He is studying geometry.
geometric(al) (dʒiəˈmetrik(əl)) adjective
made up of lines, circles etc and with a regular shape. a geometrical design on wallpaper.
ˌgeoˈmetrically adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The INFINITE DIVISIBILITY of matter, or, in other words, the INFINITE divisibility of a FINITE thing, extending even to the minutest atom, is a point agreed among geometricians, though not less incomprehensible to common-sense than any of those mysteries in religion, against which the batteries of infidelity have been so industriously leveled.
Thus, a few days ago, a German geometrician proposed to send a scientific expedition to the steppes of Siberia.
`Every intelligent being,' said the geometrician, `must understand the scientific meaning of that figure.
Clearly, he said, we are concerned with that part of geometry which relates to war; for in pitching a camp, or taking up a position, or closing or extending the lines of an army, or any other military manoeuvre, whether in actual battle or on a march, it will make all the difference whether a general is or is not a geometrician.
To make this plain by an example, suppose a geometrician is demonstrating the method of cutting a line in two equal parts.
As the geometrician, when he is asked whether a certain triangle is capable being inscribed in a certain circle
Celsus thinks that God is known either by synthesis with other things, similar to the method called synthesis by geometricians, or by analytical distinction from other things, or also by analogy, like the method of analogy used by the same students, as if one were able to come in this way, if at all, 'to the threshold of the Good'.
Since early history geometrical constructions using a straightedge and a compass have occupied mathematicians, and in particular geometricians. In accordance with the knowledge and skill acquired up to any particular period, there was progress in the ability to deal with geometrical constructions with a higher level of difficulty.
Yes, among other things, a line is a thought construct, derived from the geometricians: a string of no-dimensional points that together make up a one-dimensional CS (coordinate system), theoretically infinite in both extension and divisibility.
In previous studies, minimal surfaces have been studied in 3-dimensional and in higher dimensional Euclidean (or semi Euclidean) space by a number of differential geometricians. For instance, the minimal surfaces of revolution, ruled, translation and homothetical surfaces in the [R.sup.3.sub.1]are completely determined in [1,4,5,8,9,10,11].