germ line

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germ·line

or germ line  (jûrm′līn′)
n.
1. The gamete-producing cells in a sexually reproducing organism, by means of which genetic material is passed on to subsequent generations.
2. The collection or sequence of such cells in an individual and all its descendants.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

germ line

n
(Genetics) the lineage of cells culminating in the germ cells
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Prof Charpentier, director of the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology in Berlin, said: "I'm worried about the use of the technology for editing human germ lines and designer babies.
And she confessed that unlike many scientists in her field she steadfastly disagreed with editing the human "germ line" - the cells that pass inherited genes from one generation to the next.
Prof Charpentier, director of the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, in Berlin, said: "I'm worried about the use of the technology for editing human germ lines and designer babies.
And she confessed that, unlike many scientists in her field, she steadfastly disagreed with editing the human "germ line" - the cells that pass inherited genes from one generation to the next.
Effects of chemicals on the germ lines of male mice were tested in a study designed to replicate pesticide use.
In the poem titled "There are no words for us" she writes: "There is no language // genome, germ lines, genomics / that captures / the rupture and joy / of gene-pool crossings // a channel as wide / as humankind."
They begin with basic stem cell biology, describing the derivation, properties and therapeutic implications of embryonic stem cells, and those procured from germ lines and umbilical cords.
Further, three different labs have presented evidence that an ASC can be "teased" into all three germ lines that make up all the cells of the human body.
The Darwinian explanation begins with the observation from nature that germ lines do not live forever.
A good example is the mariner which, by being functional in both germ lines and somatic cell lines, could infect many organisms, crossing several phyletic borders (arthropods, platyhelminths, nematodes, chordates), probably by splicing into viral or other pathogenic genomes.
The genetic endowment of individuals, as well as the germ lines from which they emerge, are among the natural resources of the earth, and possession of a child endowed with good genes should obligate his parents to compensate others for their possession of him as of other natural resources by payment into a global common fund.
In many plants and invertebrate animals with various asexual modes of reproduction, the usual distinctions between individuals and populations, between somatic lines and germ lines, and between aging and immortality, all become even more ambiguous (Rose).