germander


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ger·man·der

 (jər-măn′dər)
n.
Any of various usually aromatic plants of the genus Teucrium of the mint family, having purplish or reddish flowers.

[Middle English germandre, from Old French germandree, alteration of Medieval Latin germandrea, from Late Greek khamandrua, from Greek khamaidrūs : khamai, on the ground; see dhghem- in Indo-European roots + drūs, oak; see deru- in Indo-European roots.]

germander

(dʒɜːˈmændə)
n
(Plants) any of several plants of the genus Teucrium, esp T. chamaedrys (wall germander) of Europe, having two-lipped flowers with a very small upper lip: family Lamiaceae (labiates)
[C15: from Medieval Latin germandrea, from Late Greek khamandrua, from Greek khamaidrus, from khamai on the ground + drus oak tree]

ger•man•der

(dʒərˈmæn dər)

n.
any plant or shrub of the genus Teucrium, of the mint family.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Medieval Latin germandr(e)a < Late Greek chamandryá]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.germander - any of various plants of the genus Teucriumgermander - any of various plants of the genus Teucrium
genus Teucrium, Teucrium - large widely distributed genus of perennial herbs or shrubs or subshrubs; native to Mediterranean region to western Asia
American germander, Teucrium canadense, wood sage - subshrub with serrate leaves and cream-colored to pink or purple flowers in spikelike racemes; North America
Teucrium chamaedrys, wall germander - European perennial subshrub with red-purple or bright rose flowers with red and white spots
cat thyme, marum, Teucrium marum - Mediterranean germander having small hairy leaves and reddish purple flowers; attractive to cats
Teucrium scorodonia, wood sage - European germander with one-sided racemes of yellow flowers; naturalized in North America
subshrub, suffrutex - low-growing woody shrub or perennial with woody base
References in classic literature ?
For December, and January, and the latter part of November, you must take such things as are green all winter: holly; ivy; bays; juniper; cypress-trees; yew; pine-apple-trees; fir-trees; rosemary; lavender; periwinkle, the white, the purple, and the blue; germander; flags; orangetrees; lemon-trees; and myrtles, if they be stoved; and sweet marjoram, warm set.
I like also little heaps, in the nature of mole-hills (such as are in wild heaths), to be set, some with wild thyme; some with pinks; some with germander, that gives a good flower to the eye; some with periwinkle; some with violets; some with strawberries; some with cowslips; some with daisies; some with red roses; some with lilium convallium; some with sweet-williams red; some with bear's-foot: and the like low flowers, being withal sweet and sightly.
Breuner listed other herbal products available online but deemed unsafe for children: aconite (also known as bushi), species from the genus Aristolochia, belladonna, blue cohosh, borage, broom, calamus, chaparral, coltsfoot, comfrey, germander, life root, lobelia, pennyroyal, poke root, sassafras, skullcap, tansy ragwort, and wormwood.
Breuner listed herbal products available online but deemed unsafe for children: aconite (also known as bushi), species from the genus Aristolochia, belladonna, blue cohosh, borage, broom, calamus, chaparral, coltsfoot, comfrey germander, life root, lobelia, pennyroyal, poke root, sassafras, skullcap, tansy ragwort, and wormwood.
Teucrium chamaedrys L, known as wall germander, is a small herbaceous, perennial and aromatic plant (Abdualmjid and Sergi 2013).
An intrinsic form of HILI such as germander (Teucrium chamaedrys) hepatotoxicity is a typical liver injury of the intrinsic form, since it is dose dependent and reproducible in mice [13].
Un blodyn dwi'n arbennig o hoff o'i weld yn gynnar yn y gwanwyn ydi llygad doli (Veronica chaemaedrys; Germander speedwell).
Entre las hierbas consideradas por el Instituto Nacional de Salud (NIH por sus siglas en ingles) en los Estados Unidos(23), se describen: Jin Bu Huan (26), Ma Huang (27), Paeonia (28), Dai Saiko To (29), Sho Saiko To (30) y Shou Wu Pian (31) (Hierbas Chinas o asiaticas), Consuelda (32), Germander (33,34), Celidonia mayor (35), Kava (36), Chaparral (37), Atractylis (38), Callilepsis (39), Cascara sagrada (40), Aceite margosa (41), Aceite pennyroyal (42), Palma enana americana (43), Sassafras (44), Valeriana (45), Senna (40), te verde (46), hierba de San Juan (47), Aloe vera (48), Cohosh negro (49), Ginkgo (45), Ginseng (50), Glucosamina (51), muerdago (52), Noni (53), Skullcap (54) y Usnico acido (55), entre otros.
Germander (Teucrium polium L.) (Quezel and Santa) [12], our work sample belongs to the Lamiaceae family, originated in the Mediterranean region and the Middle East.