germinability

germinability

(ˌdʒɜːmɪnəˈbɪlɪtɪ)
n
(Botany) the ability of a seed to germinate
References in periodicals archive ?
The germinability of self- and cross-pollen was studied with germination tests, and only pollen that had germinability higher than 30% was used in the crosses.
However, associations between phylogenetic groupings and germinability (measured as germination percentage, germination time, or both) whilst being significant, are very variable and models point to a number of sometimes unidentified alternative explanators.
Next, the seeds were immersed in hot water (80oC) for 3 min to enhance their germinability (Swarbrick and Mercado, 1987; Lonsdale, 1993).
To more precisely document the viability and germinability of study species, we stimulated seeds (Liatns ohlingerae, Eryngium cuneifolium, and Paronychia chartacea) with gibberellic acid ([GA.sub.3]), a plant hormone commonly used to promote germination in growth chamber and greenhouse studies.
Influence of drying method and temperature on germinability and vigour of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) seed harvested in summer season.
On the other hand, in vitro germinability showed strong differences between long and medium stamens (Fig.4) and also between the different sucrose concentrations tested: only pollen grains of long stamens did germinate, mostly at 0.6 M concentrations of sucrose.
To compare the effect of gut passage on seed viability, we tested nine replicates of 10 seeds from each morphotype for germinability by sowing them on moist, washed sand in covered petri dishes at 20 [degrees] C on a 9:11 daylight cycle.
This treatment synchronizes the timing of germination (Devlin and Ellstrand 1990a) without affecting the germinability or mortality of filled seed relative to inbreeding level.