gerrymander

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ger·ry·man·der

 (jĕr′ē-măn′dər, gĕr′-)
tr.v. ger·ry·man·dered, ger·ry·man·der·ing, ger·ry·man·ders
To divide (a geographic area) into voting districts in a way that gives one party an unfair advantage in elections.
n.
1. The act, process, or an instance of gerrymandering.
2. A district or configuration of districts whose boundaries are very irregular due to gerrymandering.

[After Elbridge Gerry + (sala)mander (from the shape of an election district created while Gerry was governor of Massachusetts).]
Word History: In 1812, as governor of Massachusetts, Elbridge Gerry signed a bill authorizing the revision of voting districts in his state. Members of Gerry's party redrew them in order to secure their representation in the state senate, and out of Gerry's home county, Essex County, they carved an unlikely-looking district with the shape of a salamander. According to one version of the coining of gerrymander, the shape of the district attracted the eye of the painter Gilbert Stuart, who noticed it on a map in a newspaper editor's office. Stuart decorated the outline of the district with a head, wings, and claws and then said to the editor, "That will do for a salamander!" "Gerrymander!" came the reply. The image created by Stuart first appeared in the March 26, 1812, edition of the Boston Gazette, where it was accompanied by the following title: The Gerrymander. A New Species of Monster, which appeared in the Essex South District in Jan. 1812. The new word gerrymander caught on instantly—within the same year gerrymander is also recorded as a verb. (Gerry's name, incidentally, was pronounced with a hard (g) sound, although the word which has immortalized him is now commonly pronounced with a soft (j) sound.) Gerry ran for reelection in 1812, and popular outrage directed at the flagrant use of the technique we now call gerrymandering doubtless played a role in his defeat.

gerrymander

(ˈdʒɛrɪˌmændə)
vb
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) to divide the constituencies of (a voting area) so as to give one party an unfair advantage
2. to manipulate or adapt to one's advantage
n
an act or result of gerrymandering
[C19: from Elbridge Gerry, US politician + (sala)mander; from the salamander-like outline of an electoral district reshaped (1812) for political purposes while Gerry was governor of Massachusetts]
ˌgerryˈmandering n

ger•ry•man•der

(ˈdʒɛr ɪˌmæn dər, ˈgɛr-)

n.
1. the dividing of a state, county, etc., into election districts so as to give one political party a majority in many districts while concentrating the voting strength of the other party into as few districts as possible.
v.t.
2. to subject (a state, county, etc.) to a gerrymander.
[1812, Amer.; after E. Gerry (governor of Massachusetts, whose party redistricted the state in 1812) + (sala)mander, from the fancied resemblance of the map of Essex County, Mass., to this animal, after the redistricting]

gerrymander


Past participle: gerrymandered
Gerund: gerrymandering

Imperative
gerrymander
gerrymander
Present
I gerrymander
you gerrymander
he/she/it gerrymanders
we gerrymander
you gerrymander
they gerrymander
Preterite
I gerrymandered
you gerrymandered
he/she/it gerrymandered
we gerrymandered
you gerrymandered
they gerrymandered
Present Continuous
I am gerrymandering
you are gerrymandering
he/she/it is gerrymandering
we are gerrymandering
you are gerrymandering
they are gerrymandering
Present Perfect
I have gerrymandered
you have gerrymandered
he/she/it has gerrymandered
we have gerrymandered
you have gerrymandered
they have gerrymandered
Past Continuous
I was gerrymandering
you were gerrymandering
he/she/it was gerrymandering
we were gerrymandering
you were gerrymandering
they were gerrymandering
Past Perfect
I had gerrymandered
you had gerrymandered
he/she/it had gerrymandered
we had gerrymandered
you had gerrymandered
they had gerrymandered
Future
I will gerrymander
you will gerrymander
he/she/it will gerrymander
we will gerrymander
you will gerrymander
they will gerrymander
Future Perfect
I will have gerrymandered
you will have gerrymandered
he/she/it will have gerrymandered
we will have gerrymandered
you will have gerrymandered
they will have gerrymandered
Future Continuous
I will be gerrymandering
you will be gerrymandering
he/she/it will be gerrymandering
we will be gerrymandering
you will be gerrymandering
they will be gerrymandering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been gerrymandering
you have been gerrymandering
he/she/it has been gerrymandering
we have been gerrymandering
you have been gerrymandering
they have been gerrymandering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been gerrymandering
you will have been gerrymandering
he/she/it will have been gerrymandering
we will have been gerrymandering
you will have been gerrymandering
they will have been gerrymandering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been gerrymandering
you had been gerrymandering
he/she/it had been gerrymandering
we had been gerrymandering
you had been gerrymandering
they had been gerrymandering
Conditional
I would gerrymander
you would gerrymander
he/she/it would gerrymander
we would gerrymander
you would gerrymander
they would gerrymander
Past Conditional
I would have gerrymandered
you would have gerrymandered
he/she/it would have gerrymandered
we would have gerrymandered
you would have gerrymandered
they would have gerrymandered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gerrymander - an act of gerrymandering (dividing a voting area so as to give your own party an unfair advantage)gerrymander - an act of gerrymandering (dividing a voting area so as to give your own party an unfair advantage)
cheating, cheat - a deception for profit to yourself
Verb1.gerrymander - divide unfairly and to one's advantage; of voting districts
divide, part, separate - come apart; "The two pieces that we had glued separated"
Translations

gerrymander

[ˈdʒerɪmændəʳ]
A. VT [+ voting area] dividir de manera favorable a un partido; (= manipulate) → manipular
B. VI dividir una zona electoral de manera favorable a un partido

gerrymander

(Pol)
vt to gerrymander constituency boundariesWahlkreisschiebungen vornehmen
References in periodicals archive ?
Per The New York Times, Pennsylvania Democrats had hoped for a fair map but were instead gifted with a gerrymandered map favoring their party by the Democratic-leaning state supreme court.
When legislators vote for gerrymandered districts--and when they vote against bills that would prohibit gerrymandering--they are violating their oath of office.
Still, Republicans have said the map is the least gerrymandered with the most compact districts in modern state history and judges should be skeptical about methods to calculate partisan gerrymandering as illegal.
Texas Republicans conceded they had gerrymandered to favor Republicans over Democrats, but did so in part to correct the pro-Democratic bias of the preexisting districting map implemented by a federal district court.
Supreme Court struck down congressional districts in North Carolina, finding that their boundaries had been unconstitutionally gerrymandered along racial lines.
Instead, the political forces that favor gerrymandered districts could be kept in check by opposing commercial interests.
In individual gerrymandered states such as North Carolina or Pennsylvania, Democrats need to win by 15 percentage points or more to have a shot at taking a majority.
And heavily gerrymandered districts are more likely to be geographically spread out and of unusual shape.
They also argued that the Act contained plans that were gerrymandered to serve political purposes and to dilute the voting strength of women and political and ethnic minorities.
They represent Congressional districts that have been so shamelessly gerrymandered by state legislatures that it is almost impossible for anybody who is a Republican to lose an election there.
BRUNELL, REDISTRICTING AND REPRESENTATION: WHY COMPETITIVE ELECTIONS ARE BAD FOR AMERICA 32-34 (2008) (asserting that voters in gerrymandered districts are more satisfied with the results of an election because the voters are more likely to have their preferred candidate win); JUSTIN BUCHLER, HIRING AND FIRING PUBLIC OFFICIALS: RETHINKING THE PURPOSE OF ELECTIONS 145-46 (2011) (arguing that bipartisan gerrymandering produces districts with more homogeneous constituencies; allowing elected officials to represent the interests and policies of a larger portion of their constituency than in a competitive district); Justin Buchler, Resolved, The Redistricting Process Should Be Nonpartisan: Con, in DEBATING REFORM 161-71 (Richard J.
Labour having gerrymandered felt they couldn't possibly lose, but they did: the sitting Plaid Cymru MP was returned home and dry.