gerund


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gerund

A gerund is the “-ing” form of a verb when it functions grammatically as a noun in a sentence. Gerunds are identical in appearance to present participles, but they are not used to form tenses of the verb or provide adjectival information.
Gerunds can either stand alone, or they can take a noun (the object of the gerund) and/or modifier(s) to form a gerund phrase.
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ger·und

 (jĕr′ənd)
n.
1. In Latin, a noun derived from a verb and having all case forms except the nominative.
2. In other languages, a verbal noun analogous to the Latin gerund, such as the English form ending in -ing when used as a noun, as in singing in We admired the choir's singing. See Usage Note at fused participle.

[Late Latin gerundium, from alteration (modeled on participium, participle) of Latin gerundum, variant of gerendum, neuter gerundive of gerere, to carry on.]

ge·run′di·al (jə-rŭn′dē-əl) adj.

gerund

(ˈdʒɛrənd)
n
(Grammar) a noun formed from a verb, denoting an action or state. In English, the gerund, like the present participle, is formed in -ing: the living is easy.
[C16: from Late Latin gerundium, from Latin gerundum something to be carried on, from gerere to wage]
gerundial adj

ger•und

(ˈdʒɛr ənd)

n.
1. a form in Latin regularly derived from a verb and functioning as a noun, used in all cases but the nominative, as dicendī gen., dicendō dat., abl., etc., “saying.”
2. a form similar to the Latin gerund in meaning or function, as in English the -ing form of a verb when functioning as a noun, as writing in Writing is easy.
[1505–15; « Latin gerundum that which is to be carried on, derivative of ger(ere) to bear, carry on + -undum, variant of -endum gerund suffix]
ge•run•di•al (dʒəˈrʌn di əl) adj.
ge•run′di•al•ly, adv.
usage: See me.

gerund

A verb form that ends in “-ing” and can be used as a noun, for example, “swimming.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gerund - a noun formed from a verb (such as the `-ing' form of an English verb when used as a noun)
deverbal noun, verbal noun - a noun that is derived from a verb
Translations
動名詞
gerundium
gerundium

gerund

[ˈdʒerənd] N (Latin) → gerundio m; (English) → sustantivo m verbal

gerund

[ˈdʒɛrʌnd] ngérondif m

gerund

nGerundium nt

gerund

[ˈdʒɛrnd] ngerundio
References in periodicals archive ?
The ablative cause of the gerund was innuendo, which meant literally "by hinting.
Dirty Gerund Poetry Series Dallas Texas Poetry Slam legend Jason Carney performs, 9 p.
The unambiguous classification of -ing clauses preceded by a subject in the genitive (possessive) case as gerundial can be exemplified by the term full gerunds that is applied to gerunds preceded by prepositions or by possessive case subject, in contrast with the terms half gerund and fused participle applied to -ing clauses with a subject in a common case (accusative case).
Dirty Gerund Poetry Series Maine poet Sam Rush performs, 9 p.
To illustrate, the task described above is presented in the Dialogue section, whereas the exercises that target the acquisition of a gerund are presented separately in the Grammar section.
In general, previous contrastive studies between the English gerund and its Spanish counterparts present serious limitations.
In this way, the difference between the infinitive and the gerund is accounted for very nicely.
Each sentence begins with It would include followed by a gerund.
William Satire responded in The New York Times Magazine, "Lexies take note: we are witnessing the birth of new meaning to a gerund.
O'Connor, a writer and former New York Times Book Review editor, points out in her introduction that "most of us don't know a gerund from a gerbil and don't care, but we'd like to speak and write as though we did.
Two sticking points here: 1) gerund ducking out signals that Eisner wants for possession: Eisner's; 2) Dame Usage decrees that precipitous be used for physical characteristics ("a precipitous cliff") and precipitate for actions ("precipitate firings") or, as here, precipitate departure.
and other grammatical forms of such words and phrases (including verb, adjective, gerund, participle, and infinitive forms).