gerundive


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ge·run·dive

 (jə-rŭn′dĭv)
n.
A verbal adjective in Latin that in the nominative case expresses the notion of fitness or obligation and in other cases functions as a future passive participle.

[Middle English gerundif, from Late Latin gerundīvus, from gerundium, gerund; see gerund.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

gerundive

(dʒɪˈrʌndɪv)
n
(Grammar) (in Latin grammar) an adjective formed from a verb, expressing the desirability of the activity denoted by the verb
adj
(Grammar) of or relating to the gerund or gerundive
[C17: from Late Latin gerundīvus, from gerundium gerund]
gerundival adj
geˈrundively adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ger•un•dive

(dʒəˈrʌn dɪv)

n.
1. a Latin verbal adjective similar to the gerund in form and expressing the obligation, necessity, or worthiness of the action to be done, as legendus in Liber legendus est “The book is worth reading.”
adj.
2. resembling a gerund.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Late Latin gerundīvus. See gerund, -ive]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

gerundive

[dʒəˈrʌndɪv]
A. ADJgerundivo
B. Ngerundio m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

gerundive

nGerundivum nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

gerundive

[dʒɪˈrʌndɪv]
1. adjgerundivo/a
2. ngerundivo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The following sentences illustrate the usage of the gerundive nominal form: 1) He was commended for taking the pains to help the weak and the elderly.
In Latin, agenda means "what has to be done" and derives from the gerundive agere, to do.
In Slovak (7a), Czech (7b) and Polish (7c), the verb can appear in gerundive form or even as a cognate noun:
In this regard, the ancient Roman and Byzantium jurisprudence righty emphasized and even celebrated the fundlamental legal importance of the "nation" or "nations" in its concept of Jus Gentium; the precision of the Latin language leaves no doubt that the Roman and later the Byzantines were referring to nations in the gerundive case.
vier, vied, vide, verge, venue, vend, veined, vein, veering, veer, riven, revue, never, neve, nerve, grieved, grieve, giver, given, give, ever, even, envied, driven, drive, diverge, diver, dive, derive, GERUNDIVE Wordsquare: Q.
Most frequently, these words convey a sense of sexual violence in their passive and gerundive forms, when modifying a feminine noun that is the object of the action.
Here Virgil is using the gerundive form of the verb for, which comes from an irregular verb meaning 'to speak'.
Much here turns, as Finnis has suggested, on the correct translation of the passage cited above, according to which "good is to be done and pursued and evil avoided." For if we pay attention to Aquinas's use of the gerundive of obligation (faciendum et prosequendum), then this first precept of practical reason may be regarded as directive for reasonable agents, and hence intrinsically normative, rather than as an indicative statement concerning human nature or an imperative statement commanding a certain course of action.
This statement's construction, with the gerundive only intensifying the sense of obligation and necessity already inherent in the verb satisfacio, (35) suggests how little choice Atticus had in the matter.
Hence, the alternative chaotic world, conceived through urban modernity, constitutes a non-spatial atemporal dimension, in which past and future are not annulled as different entities, but rather ontogenetically enfold from it, in such extent that Miller's narration and life reside "exclusively in the gerundive" (ToCap, p.180), the Latin tense of Presentness and of transitoriness.
It is not the static predicate of a transitive verb, but a gerundive: A text is being curated, and so forth.
Although no musical notation accompanies the text, the use of the gerundive in the incipit (representanda) and the inclusion of stage directions and speech prefixes establish that Hilarius intended Story of Daniel for performance at either matins or vespers sometime during the Christmas season.