thrombocytopenia

(redirected from gestational thrombocytopenia)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

throm·bo·cy·to·pe·ni·a

 (thrŏm′bə-sī′tə-pē′nē-ə)
n.
An abnormally low level of platelets in the circulating blood.

throm′bo·cy′to·pe′nic adj.

thrombocytopenia

(ˌθrɒmbəʊˌsaɪtəʊˈpiːnɪə)
n
(Pathology) pathol an abnormal decrease in the number of platelets in the blood
[C20: from German thrombocytopenie from thrombocyte + Greek penia poverty]

throm•bo•cy•to•pe•ni•a

(ˌθrɒm boʊˌsaɪ təˈpi ni ə)

n.
an abnormal decrease in the number of blood platelets.
[1920–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thrombocytopenia - a blood disease characterized by an abnormally small number of platelets in the blood
blood disease, blood disorder - a disease or disorder of the blood
essential thrombocytopenia - the primary form of thrombocytopenia (rather than a shortage of platelets caused by other conditions such as tuberculosis or chemical suppression of bone marrow etc.)
Translations
trombocitopénia

throm·bo·cy·to·pe·ni·a

n. trombocitopenia, disminución anormal del número de las plaquetas sanguíneas.

thrombocytopenia

n trombocitopenia; immune — (ITP) trombocitopenia inmune (TPI)
References in periodicals archive ?
3%, gestational thrombocytopenia and disseminated intravascular coagulation in 5.
INTRODUCTION: Gestational thrombocytopenia (GT) is a recently described clinical entity (1) which is characterized by the incidental detection of a mild to moderate reduction of platelet count during pregnancy in otherwise healthy women with no previous history of autoimmune thrombocytopenia and no conditions known to be associated with thrombocytopenia.
The most common cause for thrombocytopenia in pregnancy are gestational thrombocytopenia and pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH).
Results: The most common cause of thrombocytopenia was gestational thrombocytopenia seen in 24(33.
In patients presenting with thrombocytopenia, diagnosis of ITP is made by exclusion of conditions that may cause thrombocytopenia, which include: drug use (generally heparin, alcohol, quinine/quinidine, sulphonamides), bacterial infections, viral infections (HIV, hepatitis, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus), rickettsia infections, mycoplasma infections, lymphoproliferative diseases (chronic lymphocytic leukemia, large granular lymphocytic leukemia, lymphoma), autoimmune diseases (especially systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid antibody (APA) syndrome), disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, hemolytic uremic syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, preeclampsia/eclampsia, HELLP syndrome, gestational thrombocytopenia, and hypersplenism.
Incidental gestational thrombocytopenia appears in five percent of healthy pregnant women with counts of 100,000150,000/[micro]L.
The causes of pregnancy-associated thrombocytopenia, which may affect up to 10% of pregnancies, range from benign conditions such as gestational thrombocytopenia to syndromes associated with significant morbidity.