get going


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get 1

(gĕt)
v. got (gŏt), got·ten (gŏt′n) or got , get·ting, gets
v. tr.
1.
a. To come into possession or use of; receive: got a cat for her birthday.
b. To meet with or incur: got nothing but trouble for her efforts.
2.
a. To go after and obtain: got a book at the library; got breakfast in town.
b. To go after and bring: Get me a pillow.
c. To purchase; buy: get groceries.
3.
a. To acquire as a result of action or effort: He got his information from the internet. You can't get water out of a stone.
b. To earn: got high marks in math.
c. To accomplish or attain as a result of military action.
4. To obtain by concession or request: couldn't get the time off; got permission to go.
5.
a. To arrive at; reach: When did you get home?
b. To reach and board; catch: She got her plane two minutes before takeoff.
6. To succeed in communicating with, as by telephone: can't get me at the office until nine.
7. To become affected with (an illness, for example) by infection or exposure; catch: get the flu; got the mumps.
8.
a. To be subjected to; undergo: got a severe concussion.
b. To receive as retribution or punishment: got six years in prison for tax fraud.
c. To sustain a specified injury to: got my arm broken.
9.
a. To perceive or become aware of by one of the senses: get a whiff of perfume; got a look at the schedule.
b. To gain or have understanding of: Do you get this question?
c. To learn (a poem, for example) by heart; memorize.
d. To find or reach by calculating: get a total; can't get the answer.
10. To procreate; beget: "Is my life given me for nothing but to get children and work to bring them up?" (D.H. Lawrence).
11.
a. To cause to become or be in a specified state or condition: got the children tired and cross; got the shirt clean.
b. To make ready; prepare: get lunch for the family.
c. To cause to come or go: got the car through traffic.
d. To cause to move or leave: Get me out of here!
12. To cause to undertake or perform; prevail on: got the guide to give us the complete tour.
13.
a. To take, especially by force; seize: The detective got the suspect as he left the restaurant.
b. Informal To overcome or destroy: The ice storm got the rose bushes.
c. To evoke an emotional response or reaction in: Romantic music really gets me.
d. To annoy or irritate: What got me was his utter lack of initiative.
e. To present a difficult problem to; puzzle: "It's the suspect's indifference that gets me," the detective said.
f. To take revenge on, especially to kill in revenge for a wrong.
g. Informal To hit or strike: She got him on the chin. The bullet got him in the arm.
14. Baseball To put out or strike out: got the batter with a cut fastball.
15. To begin or start. Used with the present participle: I have to get working on this or I'll miss my deadline.
16.
a. To have current possession of. Used in the present perfect form with the meaning of the present: We've got plenty of cash.
b. Nonstandard To have current possession of. Used in the past tense form with the meaning of the present: They got a nice house in town.
c. To have as an obligation. Used in the present perfect form with the meaning of the present: I have got to leave early. You've got to do the dishes.
d. Nonstandard To have as an obligation. Used in the past tense with the meaning of the present: They got to clean up this mess.
v. intr.
1.
a. To become or grow to be: eventually got well.
b. To be successful in coming or going: When will we get to Dallas?
2. To be able or permitted: never got to see Europe; finally got to work at home.
3.
a. To be successful in becoming: get free of a drug problem.
b. Used with the past participle of transitive verbs as a passive voice auxiliary: got stung by a bee.
c. To become drawn in, entangled, or involved: got into debt; get into a hassle.
4. Informal To depart immediately: yelled at the dog to get.
5. To work for gain or profit; make money: Do you feel as though you're exhausting yourself getting and not making enough for spending?
n.
1. Progeny; offspring: a thoroughbred's get.
2. Chiefly British Slang git2.
3. Sports A return, as in tennis, on a shot that seems impossible to reach.
Phrasal Verbs:
get across
1. To make understandable or clear: tried to get my point across.
2. To be convincing or understandable: How can I get across to the students?
get after
To urge or scold: You should get after them to mow the lawn.
get ahead
To improve one's situation; be successful.
get along
1. To be or continue to be on harmonious terms: gets along with the in-laws.
2. To manage or fare with reasonable success: can't get along on those wages.
3. To make progress: Are you getting along with the project?
4. To grow old: getting along in years.
5. To go away; leave: The store owner told the children to get along.
get around
1. To circumvent or evade: managed to get around the rules.
2. To deal with; overcome: got around the problem.
3. To convince or win over by flattering or cajoling.
4. To travel from place to place: It is hard to get around without a car.
5. To become known; circulate: Word got around.
6. To have numerous sexual partners; be promiscuous.
get at
1. To touch or reach successfully: The cat hid where we couldn't get at it.
2. To try to make understandable; hint at or suggest: I don't know what you're getting at.
3. To discover or understand: tried to get at the cause of the problem.
4. Informal To bribe or influence by improper or illegal means: He got at the judge, and the charges were dismissed.
get away
1. To break free; escape.
2. To leave or go away: wanted to come along, but couldn't get away.
get back
To return to a person, place, or condition: Let's get back to the subject at hand.
get by
1. To succeed at a level of minimal acceptability or with the minimal amount of effort: just got by in college.
2. To succeed in managing; survive: We'll get by if we economize.
3. To be unnoticed or ignored by: The mistake got by the editor, but the proofreader caught it.
get down
1. To descend.
2. To give one's attention. Often used with to: Let's get down to work.
3. To exhaust, discourage, or depress: The heat was getting me down.
4. To swallow: got the pill down on the first try.
5. To describe in writing: If I could just get down how I feel!
6. Informal To lose one's inhibitions; enjoy oneself wholeheartedly.
get in
1. To enter: got in the garage.
2. To arrive: We got in late last night.
3. To become or cause to become involved: She got in with the wrong crowd. Repeated loans from the finance company got me deeper in debt.
4. To become accepted, as in a club.
5. To succeed in making or doing: got in six deliveries before noon.
get into
1. To become involved in: got into trouble by stealing cars.
2. Informal To be interested in: got into gourmet cooking.
3. To affect, especially negatively: What's gotten into you lately?
get off
1. To start, as on a trip; leave.
2. To fire (a round of ammunition, for example): got off two shots before the deer disappeared.
3. To write and send, as a letter.
4. To escape, as from punishment or danger: got off scot-free.
5. To obtain a release or lesser penalty for: The attorney got her client off with a slap on the wrist.
6. To get permission to leave one's workplace: got off early and went fishing.
7. Informal To act or speak with effrontery: Where does he get off telling me to hurry up?
8. Slang
a. To have an orgasm.
b. To feel great pleasure or gratification: gets off on gossiping about coworkers.
c. To experience euphoria, for example, as a result of taking a drug.
get on
1. To be or continue on harmonious terms: gets on well with the neighbors.
2. To manage or fare: How are you getting on?
3. To make progress; continue: get on with a performance.
4. To grow old: The CEO is getting on and will retire soon.
5. To acquire understanding or knowledge: got on to the con game.
get out
1. To leave or escape: Our canary got out.
2. To become known: Somehow the secret got out.
3. To publish, as a newspaper.
get over
1. To get across: got over the ditch.
2. To recover from: finally got over the divorce.
get through
1. To finish or assist in finishing: The rat got through the maze. His mother got him through the college application process.
2. To succeed in making contact: telephoned but couldn't get through.
3. To make oneself understood: What do I need to do to get through to you?
get to
1. To begin. Used with the present participle: got to reminiscing.
2. To start to deal with: didn't get to the housework until Sunday.
3. To influence or affect, especially adversely: The noise really gets to me.
get together
1. To bring together; gather: getting the author's correspondence together.
2. To come together: We got together for lunch.
3. To arrive at an agreement: The feuding parties finally got together.
get up
1. To arise from bed or rise to one's feet: She got up and opened the door.
2. To climb: How long will it take to get up the mountain?
3. To act as the creator or organizer of: got up a petition against rezoning.
4. To dress or adorn: She got herself up in a bizarre outfit.
5. To find within oneself; summon: got up the nerve to quit.
Idioms:
get around to
To find the time or occasion for; deal with: We finally got around to unpacking our knickknacks.
get away with
To escape the consequences of (a blameworthy act, for example): got away with cheating.
get back at
To take revenge on.
get cracking
To begin to work; get started.
get even
To obtain revenge.
get even with
To repay with an equivalent act, as for revenge.
get going
To make a beginning; get started.
get hold (or ahold) of
1. To bring into one's grasp, possession, or control.
2. To communicate with, especially by telephone.
get it Informal
To be punished or scolded: You broke the vase. Now you're really going to get it!
get it on Slang
1. To become filled with energy or excitement.
2. To engage in sexual intercourse.
get it up
Vulgar Slang To have an erection.
get nowhere
To make no progress.
get (one's) Informal
To receive one's due punishment: After sassing his parents, he really got his.
get on the stick
To begin to work.
get on with
To continue or resume doing (something); make progress regarding: We must get on with the project.
get out of
To gain release from the obligation of: She tried to get out of taking her brother to the mall. He couldn't get out of his date on Saturday.
get (someone's) goat
To make angry or vexed.
get somewhere Informal
To make progress.
get there Informal
To make progress or achieve success: I'm not finished, but I'm getting there.
get wind of
To learn of: got wind of the scheme.

[Middle English geten, from Old Norse geta; see ghend- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

get′a·ble, get′ta·ble adj.
Usage Note: The use of get in the passive, as in We got sunburned at the beach, is generally avoided in formal writing. In less formal contexts, however, the construction can provide a useful difference in tone or emphasis, as between the sentences The demonstrators were arrested and The demonstrators got arrested. The first example implies that the responsibility for the arrests rests primarily with the police, while the example using get implies that the demonstrators deliberately provoked the arrests. · In colloquial use and in numerous nonstandard varieties of American English, the past tense form got has the meaning of the present. This arose probably by dropping the helping verb have from the past perfects have got, has got. We've got to go, we've got a lot of problems became We got to go, we got a lot of problems. The reanalysis of got as a present-tense form has led to the creation of a third-person singular gots in some varieties of English.

get 2

 (gĕt)
n. pl. git·tin (gē-tēn′, gĭt′ĭn)
1. A document presented by a husband to his wife whereby a divorce is effected between them according to Jewish religious law.
2. A divorce effected by a get.

[Mishnaic Hebrew gēṭ, from Aramaic, from Akkadian giṭṭu, long clay tablet, receipt, document, from Sumerian gíd.da, long.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.get going - begin or set in motion; "I start at eight in the morning"; "Ready, set, go!"
come on, go on, come up - start running, functioning, or operating; "the lights went on"; "the computer came up"
get off the ground, take off - get started or set in motion, used figuratively; "the project took a long time to get off the ground"
2.get going - start to be active; "Get cracking, please!"
begin, commence, set out, start, start out, set about, get down, get - take the first step or steps in carrying out an action; "We began working at dawn"; "Who will start?"; "Get working as soon as the sun rises!"; "The first tourists began to arrive in Cambodia"; "He began early in the day"; "Let's get down to work now"
Translations
dát se do toho
komme igang
megindul
koma sér af staî, byrja
dať sa do toho

go

(gəu) 3rd person singular present tense goes: past tense went (went) : past participle gone (gon) verb
1. to walk, travel, move etc. He is going across the field; Go straight ahead; When did he go out?
2. to be sent, passed on etc. Complaints have to go through the proper channels.
3. to be given, sold etc. The prize goes to John Smith; The table went for $100.
4. to lead to. Where does this road go?
5. to visit, to attend. He goes to school every day; I decided not to go to the movie.
6. to be destroyed etc. This wall will have to go.
7. to proceed, be done. The meeting went very well.
8. to move away. I think it is time you were going.
9. to disappear. My purse has gone!
10. to do (some action or activity). I'm going for a walk; I'm going hiking next week-end.
11. to fail etc. I think the clutch on this car has gone.
12. to be working etc. I don't think that clock is going.
13. to become. These apples have gone bad.
14. to be. Many people in the world regularly go hungry.
15. to be put. Spoons go in that drawer.
16. to pass. Time goes quickly when you are enjoying yourself.
17. to be used. All her pocket-money goes on sweets.
18. to be acceptable etc. Anything goes in this office.
19. to make a particular noise. Dogs go woof, not miaow.
20. to have a particular tune etc. How does that song go?
21. to become successful etc. She always makes a party go.
nounplural goes
1. an attempt. I'm not sure how to do it, but I'll have a go.
2. energy. She's full of go.
ˈgoing noun
1. an act of leaving, moving away etc. the comings and goings of the people in the street.
2. the conditions under which something is done. Walking was heavy going because of all the mud.
adjective
1. successful. That shop is still a going concern.
2. in existence at present. the going rate for typing manuscripts.
ˈgo-ahead adjective
successful and progressive. His firm is very go-ahead.
noun
permission. We'll start as soon as we get the go-ahead.
ˌgo-ˈgetter noun
a person with a great deal of energy, ability etc who gets what he wants.
ˌgoing-ˈover noun
a study or examination. He gave the accounts a thorough going-over.
ˌgoings-ˈon noun plural
(usually strange) happenings or behaviour.
ˌno-ˈgo adjective
(of a district etc) which a person etc is not allowed to enter. a no-go area.
all go adjective
very busy. It's all go in this office today.
be going on (for)
to be near or close to (a time, age etc). He must be going on (for) eighty.
be going strong
to be successful, healthy etc. Our business/grandfather is still going strong.
from the word go
from the very beginning.
get going
to get started. If you want to finish that job you'd better get going.
give the go-by
to ignore in an unfriendly way. I think we'll give all his stupid suggestions the go-by.
go about
1. to (begin to) work at. I don't know the best way to go about the job!
2. (of a ship) to change direction or turn around.
go after
1. to try to win. He's going after that prize.
2. to follow or chase. Go after him and apologize.
go against
1. to oppose or refuse to act on. A child should never go against his parents' wishes.
2. to be unacceptable to. This goes against my conscience.
go along
1. to go. I think I'll go along to that meeting.
2. to proceed or progress. Check your work as you go along.
go along with
to agree with. I'm afraid I can't go along with you on that.
go around
(of stories, rumours etc) to be passed from one person to another. There's a rumour going around that you are leaving.
go around with
to be friendly with. I don't like the group of friends you're going around with.
go at
1. to attack. The little boys went at each other with their fists.
2. to do with enthusiasm. He really went at the job of painting the wall.
go back
to return to an earlier time, topic of conversation etc. Let's go back for a minute to what we were talking about earlier.
go back on
to fail to do (something one has promised to do). I never go back on my promises.
go by
1. to base an opinion on. We can't go by what he says.
2. to be guided by. I always go by the instructions.
go down
1. (with well/badly) to be approved or disapproved of. The story went down well (with them).
2. (of a ship) to sink. They were lost at sea when the ship went down.
3. (of the sun or moon) to go below the horizon.
4. to be remembered. Your bravery will go down in history.
5. (of places) to become less desirable. This part of town has gone down in the last twenty years.
go far
to be successful. If you keep on working as hard as this, I'm sure you'll go far.
go for
to attack physically or in words. The two dogs went for each other as soon as they met.
go in
(of the sun or moon) to become covered by cloud.
go in for
1. to take part in. I'm not going in for the 1,000 metres race.
2. to do (something) as a hobby, career etc. My son is going in for medicine; She goes in for collecting postcards.
go into
1. to make a careful study of (something). We'll need to go into this plan in detail.
2. to discuss in detail. I don't want to go into the problems at the moment.
go off
1. (of a bomb etc) to explode. The little boy was injured when the firework went off in his hand.
2. (of an alarm) to ring. When the alarm went off the thieves ran away.
3. to leave. He went off yesterday.
4. to begin to dislike. I've gone off cigarettes.
5. to become rotten. That meat has gone off.
6. to stop working. The fan has gone off.
go on
1. to continue. Go on reading – I won't disturb you.
2. to talk a great deal, usually too much. She goes on and on about her health.
3. to happen. What is going on here?
4. to base one's investigations etc on. The police had very few clues to go on in their search for the murderer.
go on at
to nag at. Her mother went on at her for coming home late after the dance.
go out
1. to become extinguished. The light has gone out.
2. to go to parties, concerts, meetings etc. We don't go out as much as we did when we were younger.
3. to be frequently in the company of (a person, usually of the opposite sex). I've been going out with her for months.
go over
1. to study or examine carefully. I want to go over the work you have done before you do any more.
2. to repeat (a story etc). I'll go over the whole lesson again.
3. to list. He went over all her faults.
4. (of plays, behaviour etc) to be received (well or badly). The play didn't go over at all well the first night.
go round
to be enough for everyone. Is there enough food to go round?
go slow
(of workers in a factory etc) to work less quickly than usual, eg as a form of protest.
go steady
to have a close friendly relationship with someone of the opposite sex. My girl-friend and I have been going steady for a year.
go through
1. to search in. I've gone through all my pockets but I still can't find my key.
2. to suffer. You have no idea what I went through to get this finished in time.
3. to use up. We went through a lot of money on holiday.
4. to complete. to go through certain formalities.
5. to be completed. After long hours of negotiations, the deal went through.
go through with
to finish doing. I will go through with this in spite of what you say.
go too far
to do something which is so bad as to be unacceptable.
go towards
to help to buy etc. The money we collect will go towards a new roof.
go up
1. to increase in size, value etc. The temperature/price has gone up.
2. to be built. There are office blocks going up all over town.
go up in smoke/flames
to catch fire; to be destroyed or damaged by fire etc. The building across the street went up in flames.
go with
1. to be sold with, be part of etc. The carpets will go with the house.
2. to look etc well with. The carpet goes with the wallpaper.
go without
to manage without. If you can't afford a new dress, you'll have to go without (one).
keep going
to continue doing what one is doing; to survive. The snow was falling heavily, but we had to keep going; Business is bad at the moment, but we'll manage to keep going.
make a go (of something)
to make a success (of something). He has never owned a shop before, but I think he'll make a go of it.
on the go
very busy or active. He's always on the go, from morning to night.