get the better of


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.get the better of - win a victory over; "You must overcome all difficulties"; "defeat your enemies"; "He overcame his shyness"; "He overcame his infirmity"; "Her anger got the better of her and she blew up"
demolish, destroy - defeat soundly; "The home team demolished the visitors"
beat, beat out, vanquish, trounce, crush, shell - come out better in a competition, race, or conflict; "Agassi beat Becker in the tennis championship"; "We beat the competition"; "Harvard defeated Yale in the last football game"
wallop - defeat soundly and utterly; "We'll wallop them!"
down - bring down or defeat (an opponent)
overrun - seize the position of and defeat; "the Crusaders overran much of the Holy Land"
skunk, lurch - defeat by a lurch
rout, rout out, expel - cause to flee; "rout out the fighters from their caves"
upset - defeat suddenly and unexpectedly; "The foreign team upset the local team"
nose - defeat by a narrow margin
conquer - overcome by conquest; "conquer your fears"; "conquer a country"
make it, pull round, pull through, survive, come through - continue in existence after (an adversity, etc.); "He survived the cancer against all odds"
Translations
يَنْتَصِرُ على، يَتَغَلَّبُ عَلى
překonatzvítězit
besejreslå
l'emporter survenir à bout
föléje kerekedik
snúa á; sigra
yenilgiye uğratmakyenmek

better

(ˈbetə) adjective
1. good to a greater extent. His new car is better than his old one.
2. stronger in health; recovered (from an illness). I feel better today; She's better now.
3. preferable. Better to do it now than later.
adverb
well to a greater extent. He sings better now than he did before.
pronoun
someone or something which is good to a greater extent than the other (of two people or things). He's the better of the two.
verb
to improve (on). He's bettered all previous records; The situation has bettered a little.
better off
richer; happier in some way. He'd be better off working as a miner; You'd be better off without him.
the better part of
most of. He talked for the better part of an hour.
get the better of
to overcome; to win (against). He got the better of his opponent / the argument.

He is better today (not He is more better). He is much better is correct.
You had better come / You'd better come (not You better come).
References in periodicals archive ?
Huddersfield's Brighdy Connors came up against Woodsome's Alex Byram and just could not get the better of him, as he played an excellent round to clinch the match.
"If you get the better of them straight away, then they are going to be dreading the next 90 minutes.
There are four paragraphs, starting with the one where he accuses Richard Perle and David Frum of allowing "their pro-Israel prejudices to get the better of their judgment." I don't know if that is true or not; I haven't read their book.