get-together

(redirected from get-togethers)
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get-to·geth·er

(gĕt′tə-gĕth′ər)
n. Informal
1. A meeting.
2. A casual social gathering.

get-together

n
informal a small informal meeting or social gathering
vb (adverb)
1. (tr) to gather or collect
2. (intr) (of people) to meet socially
3. (intr) to discuss, esp in order to reach an agreement
4. get it together informal
a. to achieve one's full potential, either generally as a person or in a particular field of activity
b. to achieve a harmonious frame of mind

get′-togeth`er



n.
1. an informal, usu. small social gathering.
2. a meeting or conference.
[1910–15]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

get-together

noun gathering, party, celebration, reception, meeting, social, function, bash (informal), rave (Brit. slang), festivity, do (informal), knees-up (Brit. informal), hui (N.Z.), beano (Brit. slang), social gathering, shindig (informal), soirée, rave-up (Brit. slang), hooley or hoolie (chiefly Irish & N.Z.) I arranged a get-together at my home.

get-together

noun
Informal. A number of persons who have come or been gathered together:
Translations

get-together

[ˈgettəˌgeðəʳ] N (= meeting) → reunión f; (= regular social gathering) → tertulia f; (= party) → fiesta f
we're having a little get-together on Friday, can you come?vamos a reunirnos unos amigos el viernes, ¿puedes venir?
a family get-togetheruna reunión familiar

get-together

[ˈgɛttəˌgɛðəʳ] n(piccola) riunione f; (party) → festicciola

get

(get) past tense got (got) : past participle got (American) gotten (ˈgotn) verb
1. to receive or obtain. I got a letter this morning.
2. to bring or buy. Please get me some food.
3. to (manage to) move, go, take, put etc. He couldn't get across the river; I got the book down from the shelf.
4. to cause to be in a certain condition etc. You'll get me into trouble.
5. to become. You're getting old.
6. to persuade. I'll try to get him to go.
7. to arrive. When did they get home?
8. to succeed (in doing) or to happen (to do) something. I'll soon get to know the neighbours; I got the book read last night.
9. to catch (a disease etc). She got measles last week.
10. to catch (someone). The police will soon get the thief.
11. to understand. I didn't get the point of his story.
ˈgetaway noun
an escape. The thieves made their getaway in a stolen car; (also adjective) a getaway car.
ˈget-together noun
an informal meeting.
ˈget-up noun
clothes, usually odd or unattractive. She wore a very strange get-up at the party.
be getting on for
to be close to (a particular age, time etc). He must be getting on for sixty at least.
get about
1. (of stories, rumours etc) to become well known. I don't know how the story got about that she was leaving.
2. to be able to move or travel about, often of people who have been ill. She didn't get about much after her operation.
get across
to be or make (something) understood. This is something which rarely gets across to the general public.
get after
to follow. If you want to catch him, you had better get after him at once.
get ahead
to make progress; to be successful. If you want to get ahead, you must work hard.
get along (often with with)
to be friendly or on good terms (with someone). I get along very well with him; The children just cannot get along together.
get around
1. (of stories, rumours etc) to become well known. I don't know how the story got around that she was leaving her job.
2. (of people) to be active or involved in many activities. He really gets around, doesn't he!
get around toget round toget at
1. to reach (a place, thing etc). The farm is very difficult to get at.
2. to suggest or imply (something). What are you getting at?
3. to point out (a person's faults) or make fun of (a person). He's always getting at me.
get away
1. to (be able to) leave. I usually get away (from the office) at four-thirty.
2. to escape. The thieves got away in a stolen car.
get away with
to do (something bad) without being punished for it. Murder is a serious crime and one rarely gets away with it.
get back
1. to move away. The policeman told the crowd to get back.
2. to retrieve. She eventually got back the book she had lent him.
get by
to manage. I can't get by on such a small salary.
get down
to make (a person) sad. Working in this place really gets me down.
get down to
to begin to work (hard) at. I must get down to work tonight, as the exams start next week.
get in
to send for (a person). The television is broken – we'll need to get a man in to repair it.
get into
1. to put on (clothes etc). Get into your pyjamas.
2. to begin to be in a particular state or behave in a particular way. He got into a temper.
3. to affect strangely. I don't know what has got into him
get nowhere
to make no progress. You'll get nowhere if you follow his instructions.
get off
1. to take off or remove (clothes, marks etc). I can't get my boots off; I'll never get these stains off (my dress).
2. to change (the subject which one is talking, writing etc about). We've rather got off the subject.
get on
1. to make progress or be successful. How are you getting on in your new job?
2. to work, live etc in a friendly way. We get on very well together; I get on well with him.
3. to grow old. Our doctor is getting on a bit now.
4. to put (clothes etc) on. Go and get your coat on.
5. to continue doing something. I must get on, so please don't interrupt me; I must get on with my work.
get on at
to criticize (a person) continually or frequently. My wife is always getting on at me.
get out
1. to leave or escape. No-one knows how the lion got out.
2. (of information) to become known. I've no idea how word got out that you were leaving.
get out of
to (help a person etc to) avoid doing something. I wonder how I can get out of washing the dishes; How can I get him out of going to the party?
get over
1. to recover from (an illness, surprise, disappointment etc). I've got over my cold now; I can't get over her leaving so suddenly.
2. to manage to make (oneself or something) understood. We must get our message over to the general public.
3. (with with) to do (something one does not want to do). I'm not looking forward to this meeting, but let's get it over (with).
get round
1. to persuade (a person etc) to do something to one's own advantage. She can always get round her grandfather by giving him a big smile.
2. to solve (a problem etc). We can easily get round these few difficulties.
get (a)round to
to manage to (do something). I don't know when I'll get round to (painting) the door.
get there
to succeed or make progress. There have been a lot of problems but we're getting there.
get through
1. to finish (work etc). We got through a lot of work today.
2. to pass (an examination).
3. to arrive, usually with some difficulty. The food got through to the fort despite the enemy's attempts to stop it.
4. to make oneself understood. I just can't get through to her any more.
get together
to meet. We usually get together once a week.
get up
1. to (cause to) get out of bed. I got up at seven o'clock; Get John up at seven o'clock.
2. to stand up.
3. to increase (usually speed).
4. to arrange, organize or prepare (something). We must get up some sort of celebration for him when he leaves.
get up to
to do (something bad). He's always getting up to mischief.
References in periodicals archive ?
France boss Didier Deschamps has told him he must play more and Giroud (right) added: "The coach has the habit, during get-togethers, of warning me about this."
England get-togethers are not fun but your output is likely to be better if you're enjoying yourself.
The Cleveland Retired Men's Association, which meets on Wednesday mornings in the Ayton Court Community Centre, Ayton Drive, Redcar, always has a guest speaker at its get-togethers.
The University has set-up a 'Facilitation Lounge' at the university's main campus for the retired employees as well for their occasional sitting and get-togethers. The facilitation center has been named as 'Welcome Home Lounge.
It's a time for families, get-togethers, gifts and happiness but despite all the festive hullabaloo there are many people out there with small families or no families at all.
Freshly made SUBWAY(r) Platters are perfect for your family get-togethers, company meetings or when the team is working late.
"These games and these get-togethers are very important and we'd rather be sitting here answering questions about football."
Hear to Meet is our Big Lottery funded project that is setting up social get-togethers for adults (aged over 50) who are experiencing hearing loss.
The pounds 4,000 raised from this challenge will support the Alzheimer's Society's 'Dementia Cafes' initiative throughout the Midlands, which offers caf style get-togethers for dementia sufferers and their carers.
They're just everywhere at present, plus there are sometimes tricky waters to navigate in family get-togethers at this season.
The fun get-togethers will be informal with activities to break the ice.
Although its primary aim is to foster social network ties, the women's potential collective buying power comes handy when mums plan get-togethers and other activities that keep them and their children occupied.