get-tough

get-tough

(gĕt′tŭf′)
adj. Informal
Marked by resoluteness, aggressiveness, or austerity: the government's new get-tough policy on crime.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The get-tough approach is part of the council's decent neighbourhoods agenda launched last month when fixed penalty notices for littering and dog fouling were increased from pounds 50 to pounds 75.
There had been considerable pressure on the police to adopt a get-tough policy at football matches as the violence had become a worryingly regular phenomenon.
The get-tough approach will also see youngsters caked in make-up asked to go home and take it off.
"The same voters who opposed Graf and Hayworth overwhelmingly approved four get-tough ballot measures," says Mark Krikorian, the executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies and a border hawk.
Rogue motorists face clamping or destruction under get-tough policy by Driver and Vehicle Licensing Northern Ireland.
I WELCOME UEFA's new get-tough stance on racism, just as I did when they announced a crack down on at their first anti-racism conference at Stamford Bridge three years ago.
A get-tough approach is being taken towards parents in the Vale of Glamorgan who fail to ensure their children attend school regularly.
The Recording Industry Association of America recently mounted a get-tough policy against illegal online file swappers.
2 called "Academy Standards," the second phase of its get-tough policy.
Small businesses in temporary financial difficulties could be targeted in a new Inland Revenue get-tough policy, according to Midlands accountants BDO Stoy Hayward.
Many insurers have cut back or reconsidered D&O coverage after last year's high-profile corporate finance scandals and resulting get-tough legislation on corporate accountability.