ghetto

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ghet·to

 (gĕt′ō)
n. pl. ghet·tos or ghet·toes
1. A usually poor section of a city inhabited primarily by people of the same race, religion, or social background, often because of discrimination.
2. An often walled quarter in a European city to which Jews were restricted beginning in the Middle Ages.
3. Something that resembles the restriction or isolation of a city ghetto: "trapped in ethnic or pink-collar managerial job ghettoes" (Diane Weathers).
adj. Slang
In a manner typical or stereotypical of an impoverished urban area, as in being makeshift, garish, or crass: "I pick up the pair of very big, very ghetto, door-knocker bamboo earrings" (Meesha Mink and De'nesha Diamond)."Isn't chewing gum when accepting an award very ghetto?" (Vibe).

[Italian, after Ghetto, island near Venice where Jews were made to live in the 16th century.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ghetto

(ˈɡɛtəʊ)
n, pl -tos or -toes
1. (Sociology) sociol a densely populated slum area of a city inhabited by a socially and economically deprived minority
2. (Sociology) an area in a European city in which Jews were formerly required to live
3. (Sociology) a group or class of people that is segregated in some way
[C17: from Italian, perhaps shortened from borghetto, diminutive of borgo settlement outside a walled city; or from the Venetian ghetto the medieval iron-founding district, largely inhabited by Jews]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ghet•to

(ˈgɛt oʊ)

n., pl. -tos, -toes.
1. a section of a city, esp. a thickly populated slum area, inhabited predominantly by members of a minority group.
2. (formerly, in most European countries) a section of a city in which all Jews were required to live.
3. an environment to which a group has been relegated, as because of bias, or in which a group has segregated itself for various reasons: female job ghettos; a suburban ghetto for millionaires.
[1605–15; < Italian, orig. the name of an island near Venice where Jews were forced to reside in the 16th century < Venetian, literally, foundry (giving the island its name), n. derivative of ghettare to cast; see jet1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ghetto - formerly the restricted quarter of many European cities in which Jews were required to liveghetto - formerly the restricted quarter of many European cities in which Jews were required to live; "the Warsaw ghetto"
quarter - a district of a city having some distinguishing character; "the Latin Quarter"
2.ghetto - any segregated mode of living or working that results from bias or stereotyping; "the relative security of the gay ghetto"; "no escape from the ghetto of the typing pool"
life - a characteristic state or mode of living; "social life"; "city life"; "real life"
3.ghetto - a poor densely populated city district occupied by a minority ethnic group linked together by economic hardship and social restrictions
city district - a district of a town or city
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
جيتو
ghetto
ghetto
ghettofavelle
gettó
hverfi; fátækrahverfi
getas
getograustu rajons
geto

ghetto

[ˈgetəʊ] N (ghettos or ghettoes (pl)) → gueto m (Hist) → judería f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

ghetto

[ˈgɛtəʊ] nghetto m
in the ghetto → dans le ghettoghetto blaster ngros radiocassette m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

ghetto

n (lit, fig)G(h)etto nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

ghetto

[ˈgɛtəʊ] nghetto
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

ghetto

(ˈgetəu) plural ˈghetto(e)s noun
a (poor) part of a city etc in which a certain group of people (especially immigrants) lives. Large cities like New York have many ghettoes.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
, the public should believe Dela Rosa to "getto the bottom of extrajudicial killings (EJKs)." "Believe him.
Mr Lame, who owns Getto Security Services explained that challenges facing the private security industry in Botswana were many and needed to be handled with dedication, integrity and commitment through an association.
The word "ghetto" initially referred to the copper foundry of the Venetian government, il ghetto (sometimes spelled gheto, getto, or geto) where cannon balls were cast, from the root gettare, to cast or to throw, encountered in English words such as eject, jet, and trajectory.
Eventhough she was used to speakingon television and beinginvolved with media, thetransition to becoming a radiojockey was quite differentfrom anything she had doneWhen you work on a televisionprogramme, you don't getto know the responses of theviewers immediately.
They alsothicken the mucus in thecervix so sperm cannot getto an egg.The Program Officerof Reproductive HealthProgram, under the health ministry, TashiTshomo,said possible side effects ofthe contraceptive implantmay be change in monthlybleeding pattern, lighterbleeding, fewer days ofbleeding or prolonged andirregular bleeding.
Others are 40 thieves, Yakuza, Ondafa Tuletule, Wayoo, Bidii Kweli, Baoboa, Nyuma cha Moto, Tupwa Tupwa, Gaza, Spanish Spatter, Vietnam, Temeke, Yaung Tags, Getto Youth, Watalia and Wajukuu wa Mbwa.
Carlo Ossola, nel centenario della nascita del maestro Giovanni Getto, ha ristampato il suo volume con la prefazione di Mario Pranz che, originariamente, apparve nel quotidiano II Tempo come recensione di esso.
Caption: Opposite page: Elzbieta Janicka and Wojciech Wilczyk, Male getto. Widok z Krolewskiej 45 w kierunku poludniowo-zachodnim--10 marca 2011 (Small Ghetto: View from 45 Krolewska Street Toward the Southwest--March 10, 2011), C-print, 43Ya x 52 Vs".
Although the etymology of the word "ghetto" is still debated, a case can be made for the Venetian dialect's word for foundry, geto, or for the Italian word getto, meaning "casting." To mark the 500th anniversary of the founding of the Venice Ghetto, the city, along with a special commemorative committee and the Jewish community, has mounted an ambitious exhibition in the Doge's Palace, the residence of Venice's doges (elected chief magistrates) and the seat of power in the Venetian Republic that issued the 1516 decree.
Consider East Carolina University, where Assistant Professor Guiseppe Getto and his students used the TryMyUI platform to test and improve in-house applications like the North Carolina Coastal Atlas.
But when he failed to getTo grips with a tricky wind whipping across the course on day two, he slumped to a 76 and an early exit.