ghetto


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ghet·to

 (gĕt′ō)
n. pl. ghet·tos or ghet·toes
1. A usually poor section of a city inhabited primarily by people of the same race, religion, or social background, often because of discrimination.
2. An often walled quarter in a European city to which Jews were restricted beginning in the Middle Ages.
3. Something that resembles the restriction or isolation of a city ghetto: "trapped in ethnic or pink-collar managerial job ghettoes" (Diane Weathers).
adj. Slang
In a manner typical or stereotypical of an impoverished urban area, as in being makeshift, garish, or crass: "I pick up the pair of very big, very ghetto, door-knocker bamboo earrings" (Meesha Mink and De'nesha Diamond)."Isn't chewing gum when accepting an award very ghetto?" (Vibe).

[Italian, after Ghetto, island near Venice where Jews were made to live in the 16th century.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ghetto

(ˈɡɛtəʊ)
n, pl -tos or -toes
1. (Sociology) sociol a densely populated slum area of a city inhabited by a socially and economically deprived minority
2. (Sociology) an area in a European city in which Jews were formerly required to live
3. (Sociology) a group or class of people that is segregated in some way
[C17: from Italian, perhaps shortened from borghetto, diminutive of borgo settlement outside a walled city; or from the Venetian ghetto the medieval iron-founding district, largely inhabited by Jews]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ghet•to

(ˈgɛt oʊ)

n., pl. -tos, -toes.
1. a section of a city, esp. a thickly populated slum area, inhabited predominantly by members of a minority group.
2. (formerly, in most European countries) a section of a city in which all Jews were required to live.
3. an environment to which a group has been relegated, as because of bias, or in which a group has segregated itself for various reasons: female job ghettos; a suburban ghetto for millionaires.
[1605–15; < Italian, orig. the name of an island near Venice where Jews were forced to reside in the 16th century < Venetian, literally, foundry (giving the island its name), n. derivative of ghettare to cast; see jet1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ghetto - formerly the restricted quarter of many European cities in which Jews were required to liveghetto - formerly the restricted quarter of many European cities in which Jews were required to live; "the Warsaw ghetto"
quarter - a district of a city having some distinguishing character; "the Latin Quarter"
2.ghetto - any segregated mode of living or working that results from bias or stereotyping; "the relative security of the gay ghetto"; "no escape from the ghetto of the typing pool"
life - a characteristic state or mode of living; "social life"; "city life"; "real life"
3.ghetto - a poor densely populated city district occupied by a minority ethnic group linked together by economic hardship and social restrictions
city district - a district of a town or city
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
جيتو
ghetto
ghetto
ghettofavelle
gettó
hverfi; fátækrahverfi
getas
getograustu rajons
geto

ghetto

[ˈgetəʊ] N (ghettos or ghettoes (pl)) → gueto m (Hist) → judería f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

ghetto

[ˈgɛtəʊ] nghetto m
in the ghetto → dans le ghettoghetto blaster ngros radiocassette m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

ghetto

n (lit, fig)G(h)etto nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

ghetto

[ˈgɛtəʊ] nghetto
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

ghetto

(ˈgetəu) plural ˈghetto(e)s noun
a (poor) part of a city etc in which a certain group of people (especially immigrants) lives. Large cities like New York have many ghettoes.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
"Maybe nobody will be there," Brissenden said, when they dismounted and plunged off to the right into the heart of the working-class ghetto, south of Market Street.
It was impossible that this should be, much less in the labor ghetto south of Market.
Furthermore, when the expense of the maintenance of armed guards over the pest-house, day and night, throughout the years, is considered, Walter Merritt Emory could have saved many thousands of dollars to the tax-payers of the city and county of San Francisco, which thousands of dollars, had they been spent otherwise, could have been diverted to the reduction of the notorious crowding in school-rooms, to purer milk for the babies of the poor, or to an increase of breathing-space in the park system for the people of the stifling ghetto. But had Walter Merritt Emory been thus considerate, not only would Daughtry and Kwaque have sailed out and away over the sea, but with them would have sailed Michael.
But they were ghetto people, and were not to be quieted.
And she in the motor-car, watching, saw the pair cross Market Street, cross the Slot, and disappear down Third Street into the labour ghetto.
He passed over the Ghetto, and saw the old Jews bargaining with each other, and weighing out money in copper scales.
His boxing, and his experience in the slums and ghettos of the world, had taught him restraint.
Every ghetto resident was forced to convert his money and some property into the currency of the camp or ghetto in which he was imprisoned.
Through an examination of the ways in which the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising was reported in April and May of 1943, and subsequently interpreted and commemorated in the first year after the revolt, we can begin to understand how and why the event was transformed into the defining symbol of Jewish resistance, Jewish sacrifice, and Jewish martyrdom during and after World War II.
'There is no other place that will have served our objective better than Ajegunle, which to us, represents a ghetto city.
In the first year of the Warsaw Ghetto, 70,000 people died from disease and malnutrition in what Holocaust researcher Wolfgang Benz describes as "preliminary stages of annihilation."