ghost prisoner


Also found in: Wikipedia.

ghost prisoner

n
(Law) informal a prisoner, esp one held in US military captivity, whose detention is not publicly acknowledged
References in periodicals archive ?
Sanchez and other senior officers, and he pledged to investigate the ghost prisoner affair.
She said that CIA torture cells were also replete with prisoners from other Muslim countries, as CIA had also admitted that they had quite a few ghost prisoners still with them.
We will eventually reunite these ghost prisoners with their human rights.'
We will eventually reunite these ghost prisoners with their human rights." The United Nation's special rapporteur on torture, Manfred Nowak, said in
"In March 2005 it was revealed that the Bush administration had approved a secret program right after September 11 allowing the CIA to transfer suspected terrorists ('ghost prisoners') for imprisonment and interrogation in 'black hole' prisons in such countries as Egypt, Syria, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, and Pakistan, all noted for torturing their prisoners.
You have been warned: this is a deeply courageous and troubling expose of a deeply troubling US government programme by which torture has been procured by 'rendering' (spook jargon for capturing and transporting) 'ghost prisoners' either to their own homelands, to proxy allies of the United States or direct to Guantanamo Bay, as a key strategy in the war on terror.
Suspects are often said to be kept as "ghost prisoners" on secretive CIA transport planes which fly them to countries where there is a "no-questions-asked" attitude to interrogation.
The CIA, of course, refuses to acknowledge the existence of these "black sites" and the "ghost prisoners" they hold; to do so would almost certainly subject the US government to legal challenges, since these prisoners are allegedly submitted to "enhanced interrogation techniques" (i.e., torture).