ghostly

(redirected from ghostlier)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

ghostly

characteristic of a ghost; phantasmal; spectral; wraithlike; unearthly: a ghostly silence
Not to be confused with:
ghastly – dreadful; horrible: a ghastly murder; deathlike, pallid, cadaverous

ghost·ly

 (gōst′lē)
adj. ghost·li·er, ghost·li·est
1. Of, relating to, or resembling a ghost, a wraith, or an apparition; spectral.
2. Of or relating to the soul or spirit; spiritual.

ghost′li·ness n.
ghost′ly adv.

ghostly

(ˈɡəʊstlɪ)
adj, -lier or -liest
1. of or resembling a ghost; spectral: a ghostly face appeared at the window.
2. suggesting the presence of ghosts; eerie
3. archaic of or relating to the soul or spirit
ˈghostliness n

ghost•ly

(ˈgoʊst li)

adj. -li•er, -li•est.
1. of, characteristic of, or resembling a ghost; spectral.
2. spiritual.
[before 900]
ghost′li•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.ghostly - resembling or characteristic of a phantom; "a ghostly face at the window"; "a phantasmal presence in the room"; "spectral emanations"; "spiritual tappings at a seance"
supernatural - not existing in nature or subject to explanation according to natural laws; not physical or material; "supernatural forces and occurrences and beings"

ghostly

adjective unearthly, weird, phantom, eerie, supernatural, uncanny, spooky (informal), spectral, eldritch (poetic), ghostlike, phantasmal The moon shed a ghostly light on the fields.

ghostly

adjective
Gruesomely suggestive of ghosts or death:
Translations
شَبَحي
přízračný
åndelig
draugalegur
kot duh
hayalet gibi

ghostly

[ˈgəustlɪ] ADJfantasmal, espectral

ghostly

[ˈgəʊstli] adjfantomatiqueghost story nhistoire f de revenantsghost town nville f fantômeghost train n (British)train m fantômeghost-write [ˈgəʊstraɪt] vt
He didn't write it, the book was ghost-written → Il ne l'a pas écrit, le livre a été écrit par un nègre.

ghostly

adj (+er)geisterhaft, gespenstisch; a ghostly presencedie Gegenwart eines Geistes

ghostly

[ˈgəʊstlɪ] adjspettrale
a ghostly apparition → uno spettro

ghost

(gəust) noun
a spirit, usually of a dead person. Do you believe in ghosts?; Hamlet thought he saw his father's ghost.
ˈghostly adjective
of or like a ghost or ghosts. a ghostly figure.
give up the ghost
to die.
References in periodicals archive ?
Blessed rage for order, pale Ramon, The maker's rage to order words of the sea, Words of the fragrant portals, dimly-starred, And of ourselves and of our origins, In ghostlier demarcations, keener sounds.
Willamette Repertory Theatre is tweaking its ghostlier version of "A Christmas Carol," which it also produced last year in an effort to cash in on the success that Actors Cabaret of Eugene has enjoyed with the Broadway musical version of the show.
(2) Michael Davidson, Ghostlier Demarcations: Modern Poetry and the Material Word (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997), p.
"Fictional narrators tend to be ghostly figures, and Margaret is ghostlier than most, but that may be because Vida Winter remains so incandescently alive, even though she is old and her life is drawing to its close....
Blessed rage for order, pale Ramon The maker's rage for order words of the sea, And of ourselves and of our origins In ghostlier demarcations, keener sounds.
Bringing that note of artifice to the natural world--our sense of our not being at home--she makes it newly visible, a realization Stevens' speaker finds himself applying as he turns to Key West and sees "The lights in the fishing boats at anchor there, / As the night descended, tilting in the air." What he notices is that the lights, "Fixing emblazoned zones," seem by their presence to be "Arranging, deepening, enchanting night," allowing it to speak in "ghostlier demarcations, keener sounds." That, the speaker suggests, riding a wave of excitement and putting aside his careful distinguishing of the equally powerful roles of voice and sea, could only be described as "Master[ing] the night," an outgrowth of "The maker's rage to order."
That's in Ghostlier Demarcations: Modern Poetry and Material World (U.C.
Indeed, Davidson's critical examination of "the material word" renders such demarcations, as his title has it, "ghostlier." Davidson's book, the best among this very good bunch, sets out to provide a "materialist reading" of modern poetry, and to do so Davidson inflects the figure of the palimpsest so often employed in discussions of modernist textuality "to include specific forms of textual production" (8).
The three books under discussion in this review essay--Michael Davidson's Ghostlier Demarcations: Modern Poetry and the Material Word, Aldon Lynn Nielsen's Black Chant: Languages of African-American Postmodernism, and Jed Rasula's The American Poetry Wax Museum: Reality Effects, 1940-1990--raise a number of provocative issues.